11 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The album title is meant to suppose the difference between The Mekons’ acoustic and electric sides, their ability to take old-world music forms and make them relevant to their audience, which has always been an odd mix of punks, avant-garde aficionados, folk enthusiasts, and flat-out rock fans. “Warm Summer Sun” is the opening acoustic walk through the centuries, while “Space in Your Face” immediately brings the full band to a celebratory height. This push and pull between the joyous and forlorn has made The Mekons one of the most underrated and versatile groups of any era. “Geeshie” dips its toe into Tin Pan Alley. “I Fall Asleep” proudly re-creates the feeling of a woozy-boozy evening in the parlor. “Calling All Demons” crosses the blues with a touch of Roky Erickson psychedelia. Sally Timms evokes the eerie end of the line with “Ugly Bethesda,” while “The Devil at Rest” brings a modern production to meet with the group’s best ensemble-vocal cast.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The album title is meant to suppose the difference between The Mekons’ acoustic and electric sides, their ability to take old-world music forms and make them relevant to their audience, which has always been an odd mix of punks, avant-garde aficionados, folk enthusiasts, and flat-out rock fans. “Warm Summer Sun” is the opening acoustic walk through the centuries, while “Space in Your Face” immediately brings the full band to a celebratory height. This push and pull between the joyous and forlorn has made The Mekons one of the most underrated and versatile groups of any era. “Geeshie” dips its toe into Tin Pan Alley. “I Fall Asleep” proudly re-creates the feeling of a woozy-boozy evening in the parlor. “Calling All Demons” crosses the blues with a touch of Roky Erickson psychedelia. Sally Timms evokes the eerie end of the line with “Ugly Bethesda,” while “The Devil at Rest” brings a modern production to meet with the group’s best ensemble-vocal cast.

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