12 Songs, 1 Hour 1 Minute

EDITORS’ NOTES

Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah has steadily broadened the scope of his artistry beyond the trumpet, never more so than with Ancestral Recall. The horn still plays a vital role, with its urgent high-register cries and harmonized melodies. But rhythm is the emphasis here, situating Scott’s New Orleans heritage in a global perspective as he conjures electronic pulses and gives a central role to the West African percussion of Weedie Braimah and the drumming of Corey Fonville (with three additional percussionists on the first two tracks). While pianist Lawrence Fields, flutist Elena Pinderhughes, alto saxophonist Logan Richardson, and bassist Kris Funn make appearances, Scott is after something other than the sound of a jazz band. The sonic fabric of Ancestral Recall is sparse, enigmatic; even when a more band-oriented sound does emerge, as on “Forevergirl,” there are elements of harmony and texture that remain almost unidentifiable. On “Overcomer” and “Prophesy,” Scott works alone, using electronic tools and his own voice in a quest for new expressive terrain.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah has steadily broadened the scope of his artistry beyond the trumpet, never more so than with Ancestral Recall. The horn still plays a vital role, with its urgent high-register cries and harmonized melodies. But rhythm is the emphasis here, situating Scott’s New Orleans heritage in a global perspective as he conjures electronic pulses and gives a central role to the West African percussion of Weedie Braimah and the drumming of Corey Fonville (with three additional percussionists on the first two tracks). While pianist Lawrence Fields, flutist Elena Pinderhughes, alto saxophonist Logan Richardson, and bassist Kris Funn make appearances, Scott is after something other than the sound of a jazz band. The sonic fabric of Ancestral Recall is sparse, enigmatic; even when a more band-oriented sound does emerge, as on “Forevergirl,” there are elements of harmony and texture that remain almost unidentifiable. On “Overcomer” and “Prophesy,” Scott works alone, using electronic tools and his own voice in a quest for new expressive terrain.

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