27 Songs, 1 Hour 13 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Pete Seeger’s monumental career of 70-plus years spanned from World War II to the Internet age, influencing at least four generations of folk music enthusiasts. Among his most productive years were those spent recording for Moses Asch’s Folkways label in the late ‘50s and early ‘60s. American Favorite Ballads, Vol. 2 combines songs from the original 1958 album by that title with assorted tracks from other Folkways Seeger releases, resulting in a fine compilation that covers nearly all the aspects of the artist’s work. Pete is at the height of his powers as he sings out in an earnest tenor that’s by turns gentle, mournful, and defiant. Accompanying himself on guitar and banjo, he proves equally adept at Anglo-American balladry (“Black Is the Color of My True Love’s Hair,” “Barbara Allen”), gospel tunes (“Oh, What a Beautiful City”), New Orleans laments (“House of the Rising Sun”), sea shanties (“Blow the Man Down”), and children’s ditties (“Froggie Went a Courtin’”). His spirited, voice-stretching version of “Wimoweh” is a special treat. These recordings show Seeger’s flawless command of his material and his rare combination of humility and fearlessness as an artist.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Pete Seeger’s monumental career of 70-plus years spanned from World War II to the Internet age, influencing at least four generations of folk music enthusiasts. Among his most productive years were those spent recording for Moses Asch’s Folkways label in the late ‘50s and early ‘60s. American Favorite Ballads, Vol. 2 combines songs from the original 1958 album by that title with assorted tracks from other Folkways Seeger releases, resulting in a fine compilation that covers nearly all the aspects of the artist’s work. Pete is at the height of his powers as he sings out in an earnest tenor that’s by turns gentle, mournful, and defiant. Accompanying himself on guitar and banjo, he proves equally adept at Anglo-American balladry (“Black Is the Color of My True Love’s Hair,” “Barbara Allen”), gospel tunes (“Oh, What a Beautiful City”), New Orleans laments (“House of the Rising Sun”), sea shanties (“Blow the Man Down”), and children’s ditties (“Froggie Went a Courtin’”). His spirited, voice-stretching version of “Wimoweh” is a special treat. These recordings show Seeger’s flawless command of his material and his rare combination of humility and fearlessness as an artist.

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