16 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This is one of the most satisfying albums in Fred McDowell's career, perhaps second only to the electrifying I Do Not Play No Rock ‘n’ Roll. And though McDowell recorded sanctified blues throughout his brief career, this is also the Delta slide great's only gospel album, recorded with his wife Annie Mae and the Hunter's Chapel Singers of Como, Mississippi also contributing vocals. There's a spirited looseness to the album that's joyous and infectious as McDowell's bottleneck plays call and response with the congregant singers, who take turns singing lead vocals. This 1966 release is very likely where the Stones borrowed their version of "You Got To Move" as well as where Ry Cooder copped his take on "Jesus Is On the Main Line." This entire stunning album easily ranks among the best sanctified blues albums by a single artist.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This is one of the most satisfying albums in Fred McDowell's career, perhaps second only to the electrifying I Do Not Play No Rock ‘n’ Roll. And though McDowell recorded sanctified blues throughout his brief career, this is also the Delta slide great's only gospel album, recorded with his wife Annie Mae and the Hunter's Chapel Singers of Como, Mississippi also contributing vocals. There's a spirited looseness to the album that's joyous and infectious as McDowell's bottleneck plays call and response with the congregant singers, who take turns singing lead vocals. This 1966 release is very likely where the Stones borrowed their version of "You Got To Move" as well as where Ry Cooder copped his take on "Jesus Is On the Main Line." This entire stunning album easily ranks among the best sanctified blues albums by a single artist.

TITLE TIME

More By Mississippi Fred McDowell

You May Also Like