12 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Elegant and emotional in equal measure, La Santa Cecilia continue to raid the past, drawing on the sensual precision of Argentinian tango, the laidback sway of Brazilian jazz, the rousing drive of Mexican folk, and more. Playing with both poise and panache on Amar y Vivir, the band weaves intoxicating webs of classical guitar melody on "Ódiame,” and scores an imaginary melodrama with the lonesome strings of “Como Dios Mando.” But with a voice that’s both sweet and stormy, it’s the dynamism of frontwoman Marisol Hernandez that elevates the album beyond chic homage, tapping deep reserves of passion on duets like “Ingrata” and solo showcases like “Mar y Cielo.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Elegant and emotional in equal measure, La Santa Cecilia continue to raid the past, drawing on the sensual precision of Argentinian tango, the laidback sway of Brazilian jazz, the rousing drive of Mexican folk, and more. Playing with both poise and panache on Amar y Vivir, the band weaves intoxicating webs of classical guitar melody on "Ódiame,” and scores an imaginary melodrama with the lonesome strings of “Como Dios Mando.” But with a voice that’s both sweet and stormy, it’s the dynamism of frontwoman Marisol Hernandez that elevates the album beyond chic homage, tapping deep reserves of passion on duets like “Ingrata” and solo showcases like “Mar y Cielo.”

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