16 Songs, 1 Hour 12 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Mott the Hoople were about to disband, frustrated with poor sales and an inability to capture their live energy on record, when David Bowie, just about to launch into his “Ziggy Stardust” phase, offered to produce their next album, penning the title track that became one of the glam rock era’s most identifiable anthems. Bowie not only caught the band’s energy, but also produced a definitive album that best represents early ‘70’s rock’s strongest assets: tough guitars, spirited rockers, a singer in Ian Hunter who comes across as one of rock’s true believers, and a sense of fun and mischief that future punk groups would take to heart. The album begins with a light and swinging version of “Sweet Jane,” a then-obscure track by the Velvet Underground whose singer, Lou Reed, Bowie was also producing an album for in 1972 (Transformer). The band’s originals were among their most fully realized as “Momma’s Little Jewel” and “One of the Boys” displays the band’s loose, funky street-swaggering side. “Ready for Love / After Lights” showcases a tune that guitarist Mick Ralphs would bring with him to his next group, Bad Company. The expanded edition contains seven bonus cuts, including a version of “Dudes” with David Bowie singing lead, a live “Sweet Jane” and “Sucker” from a successful night at the Hammersmith Odeon, along with several worthy demos.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Mott the Hoople were about to disband, frustrated with poor sales and an inability to capture their live energy on record, when David Bowie, just about to launch into his “Ziggy Stardust” phase, offered to produce their next album, penning the title track that became one of the glam rock era’s most identifiable anthems. Bowie not only caught the band’s energy, but also produced a definitive album that best represents early ‘70’s rock’s strongest assets: tough guitars, spirited rockers, a singer in Ian Hunter who comes across as one of rock’s true believers, and a sense of fun and mischief that future punk groups would take to heart. The album begins with a light and swinging version of “Sweet Jane,” a then-obscure track by the Velvet Underground whose singer, Lou Reed, Bowie was also producing an album for in 1972 (Transformer). The band’s originals were among their most fully realized as “Momma’s Little Jewel” and “One of the Boys” displays the band’s loose, funky street-swaggering side. “Ready for Love / After Lights” showcases a tune that guitarist Mick Ralphs would bring with him to his next group, Bad Company. The expanded edition contains seven bonus cuts, including a version of “Dudes” with David Bowie singing lead, a live “Sweet Jane” and “Sucker” from a successful night at the Hammersmith Odeon, along with several worthy demos.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
37 Ratings

37 Ratings

susanphila ,

All the Young Dudes

One of the most exceptional albums ever. Brings tears to my eyes, every time.

Glynnis Lee ,

Outstanding album!

Sweet Jane originally by lou Reed is a great way to start the album. Of course All the Young dudes is the most popular hit. Ready for love may have been made famous by Bad Company (Mick Ralphs joined bad company after Mott) but sounds best when played right before Sea Diver. Which is one of the best songs to end an album ever. I like the fact younger people (younger then me at 23) are listening to it from the Juno sound tract, but that sound is not 80', 90's, it's a 70's glam band. They work makeup and platform shoes. No bleach blonde perm mullets or flannel with a bowl cut. Check out some classic Bowie if you want to get more into similar or influential music. Mott is often overlooked and forgotten about.

rocket57 ,

classic masterwork

This is a great piece of work. Perfectly produced and stunning rock.

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