11 Songs, 29 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Mekons founder Jon Langford is no stranger to side ventures and collaborations, and after dabbling with his stalwart Brit-punk band in early American roots music, he began immersing himself in that particular tradition with projects such as the Waco Brothers and Pine Valley Cosmonauts. His second solo outing, All The Fame of Lofty Deeds kicks up the cowpunk dust with a bit more gusto than his first, and continues his curious poking into the dark underbelly of post-war America. A piano tinkles as if in a country-western weeper on “The Country is Young,” and rollicks as if in a saloon on “Over the Cliff,” while dobros and mandolins pretty things up on tracks like “Last Fair Deal” and the Bo Diddley-flavored “Living A Lie.”  “Hard Times” evokes Johnny Cash in more than its guitar-twang, and the first-person laments of Hank Williams in “Nashville Radio” tell the story of many a wayward musician, heading for a tragic end. It’s a blessing that British ex-pat Langford has taken such pleasure in American music, and that he shares his passion so generously.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Mekons founder Jon Langford is no stranger to side ventures and collaborations, and after dabbling with his stalwart Brit-punk band in early American roots music, he began immersing himself in that particular tradition with projects such as the Waco Brothers and Pine Valley Cosmonauts. His second solo outing, All The Fame of Lofty Deeds kicks up the cowpunk dust with a bit more gusto than his first, and continues his curious poking into the dark underbelly of post-war America. A piano tinkles as if in a country-western weeper on “The Country is Young,” and rollicks as if in a saloon on “Over the Cliff,” while dobros and mandolins pretty things up on tracks like “Last Fair Deal” and the Bo Diddley-flavored “Living A Lie.”  “Hard Times” evokes Johnny Cash in more than its guitar-twang, and the first-person laments of Hank Williams in “Nashville Radio” tell the story of many a wayward musician, heading for a tragic end. It’s a blessing that British ex-pat Langford has taken such pleasure in American music, and that he shares his passion so generously.

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