13 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This mellow-voiced singer and smooth-blues piano giant was 68 and well along his comeback trail when he recorded this album with guests Dr. John and legendary R&B vocalist Ruth Brown. It's both a celebration and expansion of Brown's legacy, excavating songs like Amos Milburn's "Bad Bad Whiskey," which influenced his early playing, his own signatures "Trouble Blues" and "Seven Long Days," and new numbers such as "A Virus Called the Blues." Dr. John duets with Brown on the latter, playing piano to Brown's organ and offering a counterpoint to the leader's warm drawl with his own Crescent City croak. They both play piano on "That's a Pretty Good Love," but the instrumental highlight is Brown's spirited romp through the boogie woogie "Joyce's Blues." Nonetheless, this session's apex comes when both Browns step to the microphone for "Tell Me Who," a playful cheating song that brings the album to a full boil.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This mellow-voiced singer and smooth-blues piano giant was 68 and well along his comeback trail when he recorded this album with guests Dr. John and legendary R&B vocalist Ruth Brown. It's both a celebration and expansion of Brown's legacy, excavating songs like Amos Milburn's "Bad Bad Whiskey," which influenced his early playing, his own signatures "Trouble Blues" and "Seven Long Days," and new numbers such as "A Virus Called the Blues." Dr. John duets with Brown on the latter, playing piano to Brown's organ and offering a counterpoint to the leader's warm drawl with his own Crescent City croak. They both play piano on "That's a Pretty Good Love," but the instrumental highlight is Brown's spirited romp through the boogie woogie "Joyce's Blues." Nonetheless, this session's apex comes when both Browns step to the microphone for "Tell Me Who," a playful cheating song that brings the album to a full boil.

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