10 Songs, 30 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though the name All Hell implies a raucous soundtrack to a really good barroom brawl, it’s more like a crawl through a nighttime desert, weighed down by a belly full of whiskey and sour beer, along with a crushed soul. If Nick Cave or The National's Matt Berninger hooked up with the ghosts of Ian Curtis and Johnny Cash and watched a 48-hour spaghetti western marathon before going in the studio, All Hell could be the bedeviled result. But it’s actually the debut solo work of one Daughn Gibson, whose time on the road truck driving while listening to dark electronic music like Burial inarguably shaped his musical ID. The title track is a bizarre mash of creeping cello, a vintage cartoon marimba riff, and Gibson’s cavernous baritone, all set to a snapping, spare synthesized backbeat. It paves the way to Daughn’s inarguably strange vision. Yet the opener, “Bad Guys,” suitably points listeners down the dark and brambly path that is All Hell. The weepy, twangy tune reeks of regret, and Gibson’s reverbed vocals exude the sensual allure of Dirty Beaches (as does his use of loops and keyboards). Outstanding.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though the name All Hell implies a raucous soundtrack to a really good barroom brawl, it’s more like a crawl through a nighttime desert, weighed down by a belly full of whiskey and sour beer, along with a crushed soul. If Nick Cave or The National's Matt Berninger hooked up with the ghosts of Ian Curtis and Johnny Cash and watched a 48-hour spaghetti western marathon before going in the studio, All Hell could be the bedeviled result. But it’s actually the debut solo work of one Daughn Gibson, whose time on the road truck driving while listening to dark electronic music like Burial inarguably shaped his musical ID. The title track is a bizarre mash of creeping cello, a vintage cartoon marimba riff, and Gibson’s cavernous baritone, all set to a snapping, spare synthesized backbeat. It paves the way to Daughn’s inarguably strange vision. Yet the opener, “Bad Guys,” suitably points listeners down the dark and brambly path that is All Hell. The weepy, twangy tune reeks of regret, and Gibson’s reverbed vocals exude the sensual allure of Dirty Beaches (as does his use of loops and keyboards). Outstanding.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
34 Ratings

34 Ratings

Johnny Facade ,

On this train the conductor wears black. (Rank and File)

Heard Mr. Gibson by chance, doing a live show on KCRW here in L.A. Immediately downloaded All Hell and went to see him at the Echo, a small local club. I think the allusion to Nick Cave is accurate. I described the music to some friends as Nick Cave meets Johnny Cash in Noirville. It's a hell of an album. But not everyone is looking to go to heaven.

Johnny Facade

Dorsey41 ,

The scoop

They walk in and realize that there must be a mix up of some sort. They move further into the quaint, dark little bar and realize everyone is wearing cowboy hats and boots. It about that time that thier manager comes back from a little room off the backside of the stage and explains that they made a wrong turn about two hours and 178 miles ago and this isnt the place where their gig was scheduled.

To make the best of things, they decided to take the stage anyway as they were geared up and ready to play. So, it was at this time the band had to make a few changes to thier set and they decided to put a country spin to thier otherwise gothic style. But, being true musicians, Type O Negative delivered a very versatile show and created a new genre of music.....

Well, thats my story anyway...LOL

xanthus2 ,

Excellent Noir!

Can't believe this is classified as country.
Very cool and original but more along the lines of Scott Walker or Nick Cave.
One of the best records i have heard this year.

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