5 Songs, 1 Hour 3 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A quieter oddity in Davis' vast and often explosive recording catalog, this introspective live set of mostly ballads (which the band had no idea was being recorded) is filled with quiet miniatures and varied textures. Bassist Ron Carter, pianist Herbie Hancock and the then 19-year-old drummer Tony Williams, play with a stately moodiness, and Davis' tone, often with his trademark Harmon mute, has a sore, aggrieved edge that he said was due to JFK's assassination the previous autumn. The slower tempos and more sensitive spirit that infuse numbers here like the Rodgers & Hart-penned title cut or the oft-played jazz chestnut, "Stella By Starlight," open the way for Miles to show why he's such a towering player. It's hard not to marvel at the prismatic turns in his playing, aggressive one moment in the set's lone uptempo number "All Blues" and romantic, almost dreamy in Cole Porter's "All of You" the next. As a lyrical second, underrated Memphis tenor sax player George Coleman is convincing and full of brio, giving perhaps the performance of a lifetime. Often tagged as an exploration, this set's mood is clearly reflective, trying perhaps to make sense of the tumultuous times in which it was made.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A quieter oddity in Davis' vast and often explosive recording catalog, this introspective live set of mostly ballads (which the band had no idea was being recorded) is filled with quiet miniatures and varied textures. Bassist Ron Carter, pianist Herbie Hancock and the then 19-year-old drummer Tony Williams, play with a stately moodiness, and Davis' tone, often with his trademark Harmon mute, has a sore, aggrieved edge that he said was due to JFK's assassination the previous autumn. The slower tempos and more sensitive spirit that infuse numbers here like the Rodgers & Hart-penned title cut or the oft-played jazz chestnut, "Stella By Starlight," open the way for Miles to show why he's such a towering player. It's hard not to marvel at the prismatic turns in his playing, aggressive one moment in the set's lone uptempo number "All Blues" and romantic, almost dreamy in Cole Porter's "All of You" the next. As a lyrical second, underrated Memphis tenor sax player George Coleman is convincing and full of brio, giving perhaps the performance of a lifetime. Often tagged as an exploration, this set's mood is clearly reflective, trying perhaps to make sense of the tumultuous times in which it was made.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
20 Ratings

20 Ratings

pianoguy100 ,

Perhaps the Best Live Jazz Recording of all Time

This is perhaps the ultimate live jazz recording of all time, and the most underrated one, for that matter. The rhythm section (Herbie, Tony, Ron) is in top form. Herbie's solos are the most elegant and beautiful things ever to grace the keys of the piano. Miles is nothing short of brilliant here, and it is as if the bell of his trumpet is projecting notes straight from his soul. George Coleman, here, plays the best concert of his life, his cool, relaxed playing the perfect compliment to Miles' more edgy playing. There are barely words to describe the complex tapestry that the rhythm section weaves. If there is one jazz album that will send chills down your spine, this is it.

Tone-ski ,

Perfectly executed live jazz

LP, CD and now this. It's a go to recording for me and has been so for a very long time. It clears ones mind and inspires deeply. Layers of expression are woven so uniquely that time stands still. The ballads are relaxing, yet bold - even without the trademark Harmon mute. The up-tempo numbers really pop with a young Tony Williams on drums! Herbie & Ron are rhythm savants and balance the band expertly. In many ways, this concert is an aural decompression chamber and very much worthy of finding it's way into your collection.

Elevate Kenya ,

Elegant

This is the most elegant representation of an era long lost to most. If there is a season worthy of rediscovery, this is indeed the one.

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