9 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The James Gang's sixth album brought Tommy Bolin to the party after Domenic Troiano had left to join the Guess Who. James Gang were still bent on banging out heavy biker rock as evidenced by opening cut “Standing In the Rain,” which still rides hard on that signature boogie punctuated by Bolin’s sharp riffs and a meat ‘n’ potatoes rhythm section with lots of bounce. Even though the band lost some fans following Joe Walsh’s departure in November of 1971, they still sounded like James Gang two years later, even on ballads like “The Devil Is Singing Our Song” and the oddly mellow “Alexis,” which inadvertently flirted with mustached soft-rock. An attempt at birthing a biker’s anthem in “Ride the Wind” yielded a new element to the mix in the form of an analogue synthesizer that Bolin imported. “Rather Be Alone With You” is a soulful two-minute-long a cappella make-out ballad, while the congas and guitars that open “From Another Time” recall the magical break of 1970’s “Funk #49,” though with a glossier production here and a much-faster tempo. “Mystery” closes the album with another ballad that the band dressed up in sweeping strings.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The James Gang's sixth album brought Tommy Bolin to the party after Domenic Troiano had left to join the Guess Who. James Gang were still bent on banging out heavy biker rock as evidenced by opening cut “Standing In the Rain,” which still rides hard on that signature boogie punctuated by Bolin’s sharp riffs and a meat ‘n’ potatoes rhythm section with lots of bounce. Even though the band lost some fans following Joe Walsh’s departure in November of 1971, they still sounded like James Gang two years later, even on ballads like “The Devil Is Singing Our Song” and the oddly mellow “Alexis,” which inadvertently flirted with mustached soft-rock. An attempt at birthing a biker’s anthem in “Ride the Wind” yielded a new element to the mix in the form of an analogue synthesizer that Bolin imported. “Rather Be Alone With You” is a soulful two-minute-long a cappella make-out ballad, while the congas and guitars that open “From Another Time” recall the magical break of 1970’s “Funk #49,” though with a glossier production here and a much-faster tempo. “Mystery” closes the album with another ballad that the band dressed up in sweeping strings.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
34 Ratings

34 Ratings

avalancheman ,

James Gang Bang

Thank God my older bro turned me on to this stuff at the ripe old age of 13

CER77 ,

Classic at its BEST

When everything from the 70's became classic rock, the only bands thought of were Zep, Purple, Sabbath and Pink Floyd. Those bands were the reason FM radio became mainstay. The music from the 70's if you want to call it classic thats fine, what it really was was just good. Bands that were not headliners such as James Gang (with Tommy Bolin), would come out blow you away with their set and have you looking for their albums after having seen them. Bang has no weak songs on it and while it shifts gears throughout the album it still sounds great today. Anything Tommy Bolin ever had his name on was a quality project and the music remains timeless. If you liked Bang another good purchase is Miami by James Gang with the same lineup.

rczildjian ,

Favorite James Gang Album

I grew up listening to the James Gang and loved all their stuff, but this is my favorite JG album of all. The vocal harmonies are tight, and Tommy Bolin makes the guitar sing. The selections on this album seem more diverse than the preceding JG LP's. This is one of those albums where every song on it leaves you wanting more. It was great to find it here on iTunes!

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