13 Songs, 1 Hour 24 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This 1978 live recording captures Television at their peak, floppy-fringed and glorious. The versions here of “Ain’t That Nothin’” and “Venus de Milo” are unprecedented in their purity, while “Foxhole” and “See No Evil” charge like angry outbursts from a hostile world. Listen to the ear-bending take of “Little Johnny Jewel,” resplendent with methodically expounded and extended guitar interplays between Tom Verlaine and Richard Lloyd, and you’ll hear Television sounding like their true selves: a hybrid of art-scene punk, John Coltrane, and The Grateful Dead. Their covers of The 13th Floor Elevators, The Rolling Stones, and Bob Dylan beautifully articulate the band’s inherent detachment.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This 1978 live recording captures Television at their peak, floppy-fringed and glorious. The versions here of “Ain’t That Nothin’” and “Venus de Milo” are unprecedented in their purity, while “Foxhole” and “See No Evil” charge like angry outbursts from a hostile world. Listen to the ear-bending take of “Little Johnny Jewel,” resplendent with methodically expounded and extended guitar interplays between Tom Verlaine and Richard Lloyd, and you’ll hear Television sounding like their true selves: a hybrid of art-scene punk, John Coltrane, and The Grateful Dead. Their covers of The 13th Floor Elevators, The Rolling Stones, and Bob Dylan beautifully articulate the band’s inherent detachment.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.9 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

kthompsen ,

5 Stars just for Little Johnny Jewel

Tom is amazing on non-live albums, but people of the era always talked about how sick he was live -- this version of LLJ is a testament to that. Few people could hold their own against, say, the likes of Hendrix, but Verlaine is fierce here. This is some of the best guitar playing ever caught on tape.

musicoffkiln ,

Beautiful

They treat Knockin' On Heaven's Door like a song about dying finally has to be, I guess, treated. You can see what I mean for 99 cents, shockingly and delightfully enough (isn't the best song almost always "Album Only?"). Even Bob Dylan would have to admit that Tom Verlaine sings his song as though he were speaking the lyrics about himself, as though he were living in the song. It's eerie. The breaks are devastatingly effective. The whole impact of the song is that you imagine yourself in front of the band with your eyes shut, unable to take your thoughts elsewhere even if you wanted to. In this sense, it's like watching a movie as a young child, before you learn how to distance yourself from the characters and the story you are seeing. I would guess that most of these shows were recorded 5-7 years before I was born. Maybe if I saw Television play this stuff live I would respond differently to The Blow Up. In any case, this is what remains of that brief first run of the band, and it pretty much stands on its own merits.
Little Johnny Jewel, Venus,

ozmodiar77 ,

Lose your senses

Don't be put off by the middling sound quality--if you like TV, this is beyond essential. The single best document of a singularly great rock band

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