9 Songs, 1 Hour 3 Minutes

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

R J Lannan ,

Adrift In Wonder

Robert Linton
Adrift In Wonder

It was a perfect spring day. I was working near the Pigeon River here in Tennessee. It was bright and sunny. The clouds decided to entertain themselves elsewhere. There was a slight breeze and the smell of wild roses perfumed the air. What made it truly perfect however, was that I was listening to the music of guitarist Robert Linton. His latest album, Adrift in Wonder is made for that kind of day, or night, or week. The album is nine instrumentals of pastoral, contemporary music featuring an ultra-light ensemble. I liked every track, but I cannot help but favor such uplifting, reverie producing, and expansive music. This is Linton’s fourth album, and frankly, I wish he had more. Joining him on Adrift in Wonder are Jill Haley on English horn, Eugene Friesen on cello, Premik Russell on EWI (Electronic Wind Instrument), and Sara Milonovich on violin. With two exception, all the songs are duets. The dialogues created by the pairings are harmonic and rich. The instruments are friends. The lush, verdant music has that Shinrin-yoku Forest Therapy vibe to just about every song.
The first cut is called Gliding the Current. If you listen to this long enough you might sprout wings. The music is entirely, and excuse the pun, uplifting in a way where you feel as if your cares are stolen away and you feel weightless of spirit. Horn, guitar, and violin gently swirl in the sunlight. Don’t be afraid to look down.
Cello and guitar harmoniously blend in the tune Traces of Reflection. Like any good conversation, each instrument seems to take a turn and then they both speak and their gentle voices are heard and revered. In this resplendent piece, Robert Linton’s guitar has the last word.
If this is the music you hear when kind breezes blow and downy dandelion parasols fill the air, then play on. Gentle Descent is a melodic downward spiral that never touches the ground. Everything turns slow in this song, including the hands on the clock. Luckily, this is one of the longest cut on the album. One of my favorites on Adrift in Wonder is called Sifting Through Daydreams. Glorious Alto flute and EWI and sumptuous guitar combine on this unhurried, luminous air that seems to bring together the best parts of any day. Memories come floating by and they are easy to latch on to as the music envelops the soul.
Robert is once again join by Eugene Friesen on cello on the title tune, Adrift in Wonder. The music is a journey of discovery. All the what ifs and maybes line up nicely and become accessible when you open your mind to the beauty around you. Linton’s composition invites that first step and makes a promise that you won’t regret it in any way.
Hovering in the Sun Rays is eight minutes of pure escapism. Guitar and violin notes sway and glide on balmy updrafts that sustain them like unseen hands. The music is beyond relaxing. The placid pace and engaging melody push away the negativity in anyone’s bad day.
There is a lot of motion in Robert Linton’s music. Gliding, descending, hovering and adrift. The music is encouraging, suggesting you get out there and explore. I have heeded his advice and I am better for it. This an album that is going on my desert island list. Highly recommended.
- R J Lannan, Artisan Music Reviews

KathyPiano7 ,

From MainlyPiano

"Adrift in Wonder" is the sixth album from composer/guitarist Robert Linton. Like his previous releases, the quiet simplicity of this music is perfect for meditation, stress-relief, peaceful background music and just about anything else that might be enhanced by the serenity of Linton’s music. Co-produced, mixed and mastered by Corin Nelsen of SynchroSonic Productions, Inc., the impressive list of guest musicians includes Sara Milonovich (violin), Jill Haley (English horn), Premik Russell Tubbs (EWI and alto flute), and Eugene Friesen (cello). Linton composed all nine tracks on the album and plays finger-style nylon-string acoustic guitar throughout. Each track features two or three of the supporting artists. The title implies a dreamy innocence, which is exactly what you get - a bit more than an hour of sublime musical tranquility.

"Adrift in Wonder" opens with "Gliding the Current,” a peaceful trio for guitar, violin and English horn that suggests the feeling of floating effortlessly on a body of water with light dancing on the surface of the ripples as we dream our way to another world. “Weaving Through the Waves” is a blissful duet for guitar and EWI (electronic wind instrument) that makes any cares float away as it elicits a deep sigh. “Traces of Reflection” continues our daydream with a soulful, hypnotic piece for guitar and cello - a favorite! “Gentle Descent” is played with Sara Milonovich and while it is very peaceful, this one also expresses an air of melancholy and, perhaps, regret. I really like this one, too! “Sifting Through Daydreams” is the perfect title for the piece that features Tubbs on both alto flute and EWI. You can almost feel a warm sun and a gentle breeze in the air as you gently drift away on a puffy, magical cloud. “Casting in the Afterglow” leisurely approaches heaven on the quiet, unassuming strains of guitar, cello and English horn. “Murmur of Chimes” reunites Linton and Tubbs (EWI) for a haunting but very soothing duet. The title track comes near the end of the album and is a duet with Eugene Friesen. I don’t think there is a more soothing instrument than the cello and Friesen is a master. Together, the duo creates images of a perfect experience that takes our breath away as it transports us to another level of being (the specifics of that experience are left to the discretion of the dreamer!). “Hovering in the Sun Rays” brings the album to a close with an exquisite piece for guitar and violin. If you haven’t dissolved into a very happy puddle by now, by all means hit the “repeat” or “replay” button - you really need this music!

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