11 Songs, 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Back in 1994 garage rock was enjoying a heavy resurgence though it was mostly filtered through a hardcore sensibility, as aging punks were beginning to discover bygone Motor City bands like MC5 and the Stooges, thanks to reissues on labels like Estrus. Tucson, Arizona’s Fells were signed to the then popular indie shortly after garnering a hearty buzz from outstanding live shows and their lo-fi debut album Amped. “Mustang” opens with driving rhythms and explosive drum-fills by Rob Alper contrasted by frontman Jeff Glave’s tempered cool. “Accelerator” brought the Ramones’ bastardization of Chuck Berry riffs to the party as well as Fells’ own fuzzed-out double guitar leads – here one lead played against a backwards lead utilizing an old-school studio trick whereby the spool of tape is flipped over before tracking the overdub. “Star Time” takes a break from automotive references to play face-melting, stomach-punching, psychedelic blues punk similar in sound to what was being popularized by Jon Spencer. “Affairs” revealed the band’s penchant for proggy arrangements, which in 1994 was largely unheard of, especially in the realm of garage rock.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Back in 1994 garage rock was enjoying a heavy resurgence though it was mostly filtered through a hardcore sensibility, as aging punks were beginning to discover bygone Motor City bands like MC5 and the Stooges, thanks to reissues on labels like Estrus. Tucson, Arizona’s Fells were signed to the then popular indie shortly after garnering a hearty buzz from outstanding live shows and their lo-fi debut album Amped. “Mustang” opens with driving rhythms and explosive drum-fills by Rob Alper contrasted by frontman Jeff Glave’s tempered cool. “Accelerator” brought the Ramones’ bastardization of Chuck Berry riffs to the party as well as Fells’ own fuzzed-out double guitar leads – here one lead played against a backwards lead utilizing an old-school studio trick whereby the spool of tape is flipped over before tracking the overdub. “Star Time” takes a break from automotive references to play face-melting, stomach-punching, psychedelic blues punk similar in sound to what was being popularized by Jon Spencer. “Affairs” revealed the band’s penchant for proggy arrangements, which in 1994 was largely unheard of, especially in the realm of garage rock.

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