21 Songs, 1 Hour 17 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The one official live album released while the Doors were a working unit, 1970’s Absolutely Live was recorded in a number of U.S. cities just as the band was finding its blues roots. However, this album was carefully balanced to include all sides of the group, so while it begins with a scorching take on Bo Diddley’s “Who Do You Love?,” it also features the first LP appearance of their concert favorite “The Celebration of the Lizard” (which includes “Not to Touch the Earth” at its center). Morrison is in bluesman form for “Build Me a Woman,” hands the microphone over to keyboardist Ray Manzarek for “Close to You,” and brings it all home with the previously unreleased “Universal Mind” and an extended read of the group’s first single “Break On Through (To the Other Side)” (listed here as “Dead Cats, Dead Rats.”) “When the Music’s Over” retains its epic stance. “Soul Kitchen” closes things with one of their earliest numbers from the L.A. club days and the medley of “Alabama Song,“ “Back Door Man,” “Love Hides” and “Five to One” shows the band’s impeccable improvisatory instincts.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The one official live album released while the Doors were a working unit, 1970’s Absolutely Live was recorded in a number of U.S. cities just as the band was finding its blues roots. However, this album was carefully balanced to include all sides of the group, so while it begins with a scorching take on Bo Diddley’s “Who Do You Love?,” it also features the first LP appearance of their concert favorite “The Celebration of the Lizard” (which includes “Not to Touch the Earth” at its center). Morrison is in bluesman form for “Build Me a Woman,” hands the microphone over to keyboardist Ray Manzarek for “Close to You,” and brings it all home with the previously unreleased “Universal Mind” and an extended read of the group’s first single “Break On Through (To the Other Side)” (listed here as “Dead Cats, Dead Rats.”) “When the Music’s Over” retains its epic stance. “Soul Kitchen” closes things with one of their earliest numbers from the L.A. club days and the medley of “Alabama Song,“ “Back Door Man,” “Love Hides” and “Five to One” shows the band’s impeccable improvisatory instincts.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
84 Ratings

84 Ratings

ilonzo5 ,

Absolutely Live

The Doors' Absolutely Live, Is A Great Live Album Displaying Jim's Singing Talent On Or Off Record. Also A Bunch Of Great Covers, Giving Them That Good Doors' Sound. I Never Heard "Celebration Of The Lizard" Live (Since Only Being Born In 1991), A Good Mix Of Poetry And Rock. But I Wish "Light My Fire" And "The End" Was On Here. GREAT ALBUM!!! 5/5

Jake Buffalo ,

An Incredible Performance ruined by iTunes structure

First off .. this recording in its entirety is an Unbeleiveable and Exemplory recording of the Doors at their Live Best ... Songs you know are rendered in the Poetic Bacchanailian Intensity of Morrison.

The way iTunes (and most digital/cd versions) BUTCHERS "The Celebration of the Lizard" by breaking it into all those little clips is UNFORGIVABLE - ...

It's Johnny's Birthday ,

Blistering Live Album

This definitely represents the Doors at the height of their live power. Morrison's tenor is gritty as ever, and the band sound great too. Keyboard work by Manzerak is atmospheric and well-placed. This version of "When the Music's Over" is probably one of their better extended jams recorded live.

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