9 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With Atlantic Crossing, Rod Stewart began his repositioning from a bluesy rock singer to a mainstream R&B-influenced pop singer. 1976’s A Night On the Town continues this streak with even greater success. Stewart’s own songwriting comes on strong with one of his biggest hits, “Tonight’s the Night (Gonna Be Alright)” leading the charge, as it brilliantly balances his new playboy status and pop sense with his hearty soulful croak without losing his identity in the process. Much of this can be attributed to his solid backing group, which includes notable guitarists Steve Cropper, Joe Walsh and David Lindley, while R&B All-Stars Al Jackson and Roger Hawkins man the drums. The heart-wrenching story-song “The Killing Of Georgie (Pt. I and II)” that recounts the murder of a gay friend maintains Stewart’s artistic integrity and intentions, while “Fool for You” trends towards the lightweight and fun. As always, Stewart shines as an interpretive singer, casting new gravity and pathos to Cat Stevens’ “The First Cut Is the Deepest,” updating Manfred Mann’s hit “Pretty Flamingo” and adding a modern, Rolling Stones’ honky-tonk context to Hank Thompson’s 1952 country hit “The Wild Side of Life.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

With Atlantic Crossing, Rod Stewart began his repositioning from a bluesy rock singer to a mainstream R&B-influenced pop singer. 1976’s A Night On the Town continues this streak with even greater success. Stewart’s own songwriting comes on strong with one of his biggest hits, “Tonight’s the Night (Gonna Be Alright)” leading the charge, as it brilliantly balances his new playboy status and pop sense with his hearty soulful croak without losing his identity in the process. Much of this can be attributed to his solid backing group, which includes notable guitarists Steve Cropper, Joe Walsh and David Lindley, while R&B All-Stars Al Jackson and Roger Hawkins man the drums. The heart-wrenching story-song “The Killing Of Georgie (Pt. I and II)” that recounts the murder of a gay friend maintains Stewart’s artistic integrity and intentions, while “Fool for You” trends towards the lightweight and fun. As always, Stewart shines as an interpretive singer, casting new gravity and pathos to Cat Stevens’ “The First Cut Is the Deepest,” updating Manfred Mann’s hit “Pretty Flamingo” and adding a modern, Rolling Stones’ honky-tonk context to Hank Thompson’s 1952 country hit “The Wild Side of Life.”

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