11 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s a blissful lack of restraint to the multi-layered neon pop of Coldplay’s seventh album. The carnival kicks off within 20 seconds of the opening track and allows only the most fleeting of (Barack Obama-narrated) sit-downs as the extent of their ambition is joyously unfurled. It’s the sound of a band liberated: free to recruit Beyoncé for vocal duties on the euphoric “Hymn for the Weekend,” trade sweet nothings with Tove Lo for “Fun”’s hazy holiday romance jam, and talk Noel Gallagher into a (What’s The Story) Morning Glory?-sized guitar solo on the hymnal “Up&Up.”

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s a blissful lack of restraint to the multi-layered neon pop of Coldplay’s seventh album. The carnival kicks off within 20 seconds of the opening track and allows only the most fleeting of (Barack Obama-narrated) sit-downs as the extent of their ambition is joyously unfurled. It’s the sound of a band liberated: free to recruit Beyoncé for vocal duties on the euphoric “Hymn for the Weekend,” trade sweet nothings with Tove Lo for “Fun”’s hazy holiday romance jam, and talk Noel Gallagher into a (What’s The Story) Morning Glory?-sized guitar solo on the hymnal “Up&Up.”

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.2 out of 5
4.2K Ratings

4.2K Ratings

Pros and Hans ,

Fresh.

It's not old Coldplay, but it's not the Coldplay you've been hearing the past few years either. This is a completely different beast of its own. With elements reminiscent of X&Y, Adventure Of A Lifetime is a mix between psychedelic, funk, and pop. The album looks to have great potential and it seems like Coldplay has found a good middle ground between the old and the new.

FHBoy ,

Prepare Yourself....

....the "goodbye old Coldplay" comments are coming.

I have no problem with Coldplay evolving their sound. How many artists have the courage to do that with each new album? Props to Coldplay for exploring new sonic possibilites with each new era.

Mr.Composer ,

A Fair Fan, A Fair Review...

Well first of all, a big THANK YOU to all of the people who actually waited to hear the WHOLE album before they reviewed it, and didn’t write an album review (be it love or hate) based solely off of one or two singles. I, along with many others, am one of the people who can’t stand the fact the iTunes even allows people to review albums before they come out, nevertheless that people actually do it, and somehow manage to call it fair.

So all that having been said, I see a lot of people seem to be struggling with their (somewhat) new direction of sound/production. I only say somewhat new because if you’ve listened to Coldplay from Mylo Xyloto to now you can actually chronologically hear them progressing towards this sound and production style. "Mylo" at the time was easily their most “electronic” associated album up until that point. They constantly flirted with various synthesizers & sounds in the background using a combination of live/natural instrumentation mixed with electronic sounds. Then on some tracks like "Princess of China" and "Up in Flames”, they relied almost completely on electronics for the baseline of their beat. Move on to "Ghost Stories” a couple years later and they dipped even more into the electronic production, as can be heard on tracks such as “Midnight”, “Ink”, “True Love”, “A Sky Full of Stars”, “Magic”, etc. where they almost completely exchanged live drums for electronic kicks & snares/claps and, once again, had a heavy use of pads and various synthesizers. Some people act as if they’ve been blindsided by Coldplay’s “new sound”, but in all honesty if you had of been paying closer attention, as I said, you would’ve noticed that they’ve been progressing towards this sound for quite some time now. And that right there is exactly where the problem lies…People don’t know how to respect artist creativity and evolution. Whenever an artist decides to try something new or switch it up a bit, then people are quick to yell “SELL OUT!!!” and accuse the artist of trying to conform to what’s considered “hip” in hopes of getting a quick buck and making people like them. And that’s because people don’t understand the difference between “selling out” and simply contemporizing your sound. Selling out, is when you lose what made you YOU at your core and you begin to mold yourself after someone else’s image that is not only, not yours, but one that doesn’t fit you, in hopes of selling records. You compromise your values and characteristics to become something you’re not just for the sake of popularity. However, EVOLVING is when an artist stays true to who they are at their core, but finds new ways to introduce it to you and re-invents their style/sound and their approach to their music, which includes learning how to move with the times. And that’s what a lot of fans struggle with. Has Coldplay changed their sound?…Yes. Has Coldplay evolved into new age instrumentation and usage of electronic production?…Yes. Has Coldplay yet, remained true in essence to their music and what they’re really about?….Absolutely. Artists are regular human beings who are constantly growing, changing, and evolving just like you & me. Their music is a reflection of that and whether you like it or not...you have to respect that. You don’t have to like their new sound, however don’t accuse them of “selling out” just because they changed it.

Now, I do have to say, out of Coldplay’s album catalog this album is definitely on the latter end of it, in my opinion. It’s still a great album (hence the 5 stars), especially when compared to other music in today’s market. However, I can’t ignore the fact that their music, while great, doesn’t exactly sweep you off of your feet like it used to. The emotion conveyed through the music isn’t as gripping as it used to be. And the signature moments that used to be perhaps Coldplay’s most touching/intimate moments are almost non-existent on this album. Take for example the end of “Charlie Brown” or “Violet Hill” when Chris Martin ends the song with such grace and heartfelt melodies, or the transient/ambient end to “Oceans” on Ghost Stories. The tracks that connect with your soul on a deeper level like “Fix You” or “The Scientist” aren’t really here (at least not in my opinion). All of these tracks are great, but none of them are classic. Not to mention, that excluding the two short interlude’s, there’s only 9 tracks on the album, which I feel is a little short. Which kind of sums up how I feel about the album overall, it’s great, but I’d be lying if I said it didn’t slightly leave me wanting/yearning for more. I’ve heard rumors that supposedly this is their last album, not sure how true that is or not, but I sure hope not. Not exactly the “bang” I’d like to see their legacy end with. I’m hoping they'll do like they did with “Viva La Vida” and follow this album up with a “Prospekt’s March” EP with bonus tracks on it later on. I guess only time will tell….Either way, I’ll always remain a fan.

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