10 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This timeless album delights in at least two ways: as a heartwarming evocation of the cartoon character Charlie Brown and his buddies, and as a satisfying slice of ‘60s west coast jazz. In the ‘50s, the San Francisco-born composer/pianist Vince Guaraldi played with artists such as Woody Herman and Cal Tjader. By the time he recorded A Boy Named Charlie Brown — the album he is best known for — he had also released several recordings as a leader, including Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus and Vince Guaraldi, Bola Sete & Friends. Here, heading up a trio that includes bassist Monty Budwig and drummer Colin Bailey, Guaraldi charms throughout. The pianist had an affinity for bossa nova: the breezy “Pebble Beach” might be named after a town in California but its laid back groove is clearly Brazilian. “Schroeder” appropriately displays a classical influence, linking it to Charlie Brown’s piano-playing friend of the same name. And of course, there’s the catchy “Linus and Lucy.” Charlie Brown wraps up with a bonus cut, a nice reading of the standard, “Fly Me to the Moon.” This much-loved album was recorded in the mid-‘60s and seems likely to remain a holiday favorite for years to come.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This timeless album delights in at least two ways: as a heartwarming evocation of the cartoon character Charlie Brown and his buddies, and as a satisfying slice of ‘60s west coast jazz. In the ‘50s, the San Francisco-born composer/pianist Vince Guaraldi played with artists such as Woody Herman and Cal Tjader. By the time he recorded A Boy Named Charlie Brown — the album he is best known for — he had also released several recordings as a leader, including Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus and Vince Guaraldi, Bola Sete & Friends. Here, heading up a trio that includes bassist Monty Budwig and drummer Colin Bailey, Guaraldi charms throughout. The pianist had an affinity for bossa nova: the breezy “Pebble Beach” might be named after a town in California but its laid back groove is clearly Brazilian. “Schroeder” appropriately displays a classical influence, linking it to Charlie Brown’s piano-playing friend of the same name. And of course, there’s the catchy “Linus and Lucy.” Charlie Brown wraps up with a bonus cut, a nice reading of the standard, “Fly Me to the Moon.” This much-loved album was recorded in the mid-‘60s and seems likely to remain a holiday favorite for years to come.

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