13 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The contrast between human suffering and revealed glory lies at the heart of The Devil Wears Prada’s fifth album. Taking inspiration from Paul’s Epistle to the Romans, 8:18 is a dense, unrelenting work that contrasts matching melodic flights with searing metalcore passages that rank among the Dayton, Ohio–based Christian band’s heaviest work. The two-pronged attack of Mike Hranica’s harsh screams and Jeremy DePoyster’s radiant, clean vocals has a bracing effect, enhanced by the atmospheric keyboard work of new recruit Jonathan Gering. The band’s close attention to craft and dynamics gives these convulsive, self-lacerating songs a resonance that goes beyond their visceral impact. As tracks like “Sailor’s Prayer,” “Number Eleven," and “In Heart” make clear, TDWP continue to uphold the metal virtues of shredding guitars, slamming beats, and spine-cracking breakdowns. There's also an industrial influence, heard most distinctly in the robotic thrum of “Care More.” Pop-tinged songs like “War” provide relief from the bruising sonics of “Black & Blue” and “Home for Grave.

Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

The contrast between human suffering and revealed glory lies at the heart of The Devil Wears Prada’s fifth album. Taking inspiration from Paul’s Epistle to the Romans, 8:18 is a dense, unrelenting work that contrasts matching melodic flights with searing metalcore passages that rank among the Dayton, Ohio–based Christian band’s heaviest work. The two-pronged attack of Mike Hranica’s harsh screams and Jeremy DePoyster’s radiant, clean vocals has a bracing effect, enhanced by the atmospheric keyboard work of new recruit Jonathan Gering. The band’s close attention to craft and dynamics gives these convulsive, self-lacerating songs a resonance that goes beyond their visceral impact. As tracks like “Sailor’s Prayer,” “Number Eleven," and “In Heart” make clear, TDWP continue to uphold the metal virtues of shredding guitars, slamming beats, and spine-cracking breakdowns. There's also an industrial influence, heard most distinctly in the robotic thrum of “Care More.” Pop-tinged songs like “War” provide relief from the bruising sonics of “Black & Blue” and “Home for Grave.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
569 Ratings

569 Ratings

Cris Santiago-Rios ,

Beautiful Melancholy

After buying the pre-order and hearing Home For Grave, and then hearing the stream for Martyrs, I must say I am awestruck. Not only has TDWP progressed, they've also matured. Many in the Metal genre believe a heavier record is a progression. That may be true in SOME aspects, but progression is growing up and allow that to flow into the music. After listening to Plagues,WRAABB & Dead Throne, it is obvious that TDWP have grown as people and musicians. Both Martyrs and Home For Grave display the bands ability to create an atmosphere with their music, that in turns pulls out emotion in the listener. I've never been so excited for a record as I am for 8:18. If Martyrs and Home For Grave are any indication; this will be a mature, heavy, dark record. Can't wait to hear the rest!

pohnjarker ,

Perfect.

Borrowing from the best melodic inspirations of With Roots Above and Branches Below, sharing the dark fun and produced punch of the Zombie EP, and reinventing the upbeat heaviness of Dead Throne (and exceeding expectations where that particular album fell short), The Devil Wears Prada has recaptured the raw heaviness of their original essence without compromising their innovation. 8:18 is an entirely new animal, and a huge leap forward for the band. Simply put: Masterpiece.

Churst011 ,

His screams are perfect

Mikes screams really add to the atmosphere of the album. Everyone says "they need to find a new person" or "he's losing his voice" when really he's purposely using those screams to add character and mood to the album. I love home for grave and martyrs :) I'm looking forward to the full album:)

More By The Devil Wears Prada

You May Also Like