14 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Moneybagg Yo spent the better part of 2018 bolstering a reputation as one of the most prolific street rappers of his day. If RESET, his third project of that year and the one preceding 43VA HEARTLESS, was a showcase for his versatility, 43VA is a natural continuation of the themes and ideas present within the whole of his catalog, and the HEARTLESS franchise in particular (43VA marks the third entry in that series).

Throughout 43VA HEARTLESS, Moneybagg is wholly invested in the code of the streets, using songs like “On My Soul” to reiterate how serious his word should be taken and “Part of da Game” to express bewilderment at those who cannot be made to live with the same integrity. He trades bars with frequent collaborators Kevin Gates and Lil Durk on “Headstrong” and “On My Soul” respectively, both songs that speak to the Moneybagg Yo philosophy. He makes room for rising stars City Girls on the love-'em-and-leave-'em anthem “4 da Moment” but also shows a softer side on “Toxic,” a song that details a troubled partnership. But it wouldn’t be a Moneybagg Yo album if he didn’t flex on a hater, which he does in style across “Drais,” “Dior,” and the Offset collaboration “Style Ain’t Free.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Moneybagg Yo spent the better part of 2018 bolstering a reputation as one of the most prolific street rappers of his day. If RESET, his third project of that year and the one preceding 43VA HEARTLESS, was a showcase for his versatility, 43VA is a natural continuation of the themes and ideas present within the whole of his catalog, and the HEARTLESS franchise in particular (43VA marks the third entry in that series).

Throughout 43VA HEARTLESS, Moneybagg is wholly invested in the code of the streets, using songs like “On My Soul” to reiterate how serious his word should be taken and “Part of da Game” to express bewilderment at those who cannot be made to live with the same integrity. He trades bars with frequent collaborators Kevin Gates and Lil Durk on “Headstrong” and “On My Soul” respectively, both songs that speak to the Moneybagg Yo philosophy. He makes room for rising stars City Girls on the love-'em-and-leave-'em anthem “4 da Moment” but also shows a softer side on “Toxic,” a song that details a troubled partnership. But it wouldn’t be a Moneybagg Yo album if he didn’t flex on a hater, which he does in style across “Drais,” “Dior,” and the Offset collaboration “Style Ain’t Free.”

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