23 Songs, 1 Hour 5 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Four years after their 1998 breakthrough, Music Has the Right to Children, the Scottish duo pushed even further with Geogaddi. Zigzagging between found-sound sketches, out-of-body ambient floaters, and murky instrumental hip-hop, it’s darker and more adventurous. On “1969” and “Music Is Math,” their trademark breaks are bathed in a vivid swirl, while their synth programming takes the lead on the tabla-laced “Alpha and Omega.” Most impressive is its kaleidoscopic churn: In the spirit of '70s planetarium soundtracks, it’s less an album than a state of mind.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Four years after their 1998 breakthrough, Music Has the Right to Children, the Scottish duo pushed even further with Geogaddi. Zigzagging between found-sound sketches, out-of-body ambient floaters, and murky instrumental hip-hop, it’s darker and more adventurous. On “1969” and “Music Is Math,” their trademark breaks are bathed in a vivid swirl, while their synth programming takes the lead on the tabla-laced “Alpha and Omega.” Most impressive is its kaleidoscopic churn: In the spirit of '70s planetarium soundtracks, it’s less an album than a state of mind.

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