10 Songs, 1 Hour 31 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Fabiola Kim turns her attention to three European violin concertos, all written in 1939 as the world was plunged into war. Karl Amadeus Hartmann’s Concerto funèbre most obviously reflects the conflict that had started to rage with music of real anguish. It’s Hartmann’s masterpiece and receives a very fine performance. Bartók’s Violin Concerto No. 2 is one of its composer’s greatest works and its ambition is superbly acknowledged in a reading of genuine power. William Walton’s more obviously songful concerto has its moments of darkness though the overall mood is one of lyricism. Edusei gives fine support to his accomplished soloist.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Fabiola Kim turns her attention to three European violin concertos, all written in 1939 as the world was plunged into war. Karl Amadeus Hartmann’s Concerto funèbre most obviously reflects the conflict that had started to rage with music of real anguish. It’s Hartmann’s masterpiece and receives a very fine performance. Bartók’s Violin Concerto No. 2 is one of its composer’s greatest works and its ambition is superbly acknowledged in a reading of genuine power. William Walton’s more obviously songful concerto has its moments of darkness though the overall mood is one of lyricism. Edusei gives fine support to his accomplished soloist.

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