6 Songs, 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Leave it to Fat Freddy’s Drop, Wellington’s veteran roots-reggae heavyweights, to not limit themselves in the least for their fifth studio album. Or rather, the first chunk of it: Special Edition Part 1 is just one half of a planned double LP, blending the act’s reliable low-slung grooves with colorful synth flutters, punchy horn parts, earthy rhythms, and crystal-clear production. Frontman Joe Dukie’s vocals shine as much as ever on opener “Kamo Kamo,” but he slips seamlessly into party mode with a rallying rap section on “Special Edition.” The electronics-shaded "Raleigh Twenty" even evokes classic Jamiroquai before pursuing another syrupy, genre-mixing jam that’s as satisfying as it is hypnotic. Combining songs written on the road and in the studio, Special Edition casually shows off the prodigious yet deeply comfortable range of a core set of players who have been joyfully riffing off each other for two decades.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Leave it to Fat Freddy’s Drop, Wellington’s veteran roots-reggae heavyweights, to not limit themselves in the least for their fifth studio album. Or rather, the first chunk of it: Special Edition Part 1 is just one half of a planned double LP, blending the act’s reliable low-slung grooves with colorful synth flutters, punchy horn parts, earthy rhythms, and crystal-clear production. Frontman Joe Dukie’s vocals shine as much as ever on opener “Kamo Kamo,” but he slips seamlessly into party mode with a rallying rap section on “Special Edition.” The electronics-shaded "Raleigh Twenty" even evokes classic Jamiroquai before pursuing another syrupy, genre-mixing jam that’s as satisfying as it is hypnotic. Combining songs written on the road and in the studio, Special Edition casually shows off the prodigious yet deeply comfortable range of a core set of players who have been joyfully riffing off each other for two decades.

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