12 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Both as a club and as a collective, The Noise played a pivotal role in reggaetón’s emergence within—and beyond—Puerto Rico. On the San Juan-based group’s game-changing series of groundbreaking 1990s recordings, Baby Rasta helped lay the foundation and spread the urban Latin gospel alongside the likes of DJ Nelson and Ivy Queen before spinning off with compatriot Gringo for further projects. Considering Jon Z’s recent rise in the contemporary urbano scene, this pairing of elder statesman and young gun pays homage to the music’s history without fixating on the past. Modern in nearly every way, their Voodoo seizes on the Latin trap surge with “Sin Cojones Me Tiene” and “Ya No Eres Mia,” while the dembow riddim lives on via “A Fuego Por Ahi” and “Mi Ex Quiere Volver.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Both as a club and as a collective, The Noise played a pivotal role in reggaetón’s emergence within—and beyond—Puerto Rico. On the San Juan-based group’s game-changing series of groundbreaking 1990s recordings, Baby Rasta helped lay the foundation and spread the urban Latin gospel alongside the likes of DJ Nelson and Ivy Queen before spinning off with compatriot Gringo for further projects. Considering Jon Z’s recent rise in the contemporary urbano scene, this pairing of elder statesman and young gun pays homage to the music’s history without fixating on the past. Modern in nearly every way, their Voodoo seizes on the Latin trap surge with “Sin Cojones Me Tiene” and “Ya No Eres Mia,” while the dembow riddim lives on via “A Fuego Por Ahi” and “Mi Ex Quiere Volver.”

TITLE TIME

More By Jon Z