24 Songs, 1 Hour 14 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Shanghai Symphony Orchestra, founded in 1879, has a rich heritage, and here presents an East-meets-West program of great appeal. Qigang Chen left China in 1984 and moved to Paris, becoming Messiaen’s last pupil. His musical language is ravishingly beautiful, atmospheric, and perfumed. The violin concerto The Joy of Suffering, written as a competition piece, is gloriously brought to life by Maxim Vengerov. Like the orchestral Wu Xing, it manages to sound both French and Chinese. Rachmaninoff’s vibrant Symphonic Dances demonstrates what a superb ensemble this is and Long Yu directs with terrific authority. Kreisler’s sparkling “Tambourin chinois” makes a cheeky encore.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Shanghai Symphony Orchestra, founded in 1879, has a rich heritage, and here presents an East-meets-West program of great appeal. Qigang Chen left China in 1984 and moved to Paris, becoming Messiaen’s last pupil. His musical language is ravishingly beautiful, atmospheric, and perfumed. The violin concerto The Joy of Suffering, written as a competition piece, is gloriously brought to life by Maxim Vengerov. Like the orchestral Wu Xing, it manages to sound both French and Chinese. Rachmaninoff’s vibrant Symphonic Dances demonstrates what a superb ensemble this is and Long Yu directs with terrific authority. Kreisler’s sparkling “Tambourin chinois” makes a cheeky encore.

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