Editors’ Notes Tim Hardin’s first two albums, Tim Hardin 1 and Tim Hardin 2, both released in the mid-1960s, represent two of the finest examples of simple, elegant songwriting. (“If I Were A Carpenter” and “Reason to Believe” were his most covered and successful songs.) Hardin had the voice of a jazz-inspired angel, trailing notes off into the air, inflecting syllables with twinges of regret, sorrow and romance. This 47-track set collects the recordings Hardin made for Verve Records between 1964 and 1966 and features the first two albums in complete form. Many of the previously unreleased tracks and what was eventually released as Tim Hardin 4 are deeply rooted in blues. However, Hardin’s finest moments transcended all genres. He was never completely satisfied with his debut album, but “How Can We Hang On To A Dream,” “Part of the Wind,” and “Don’t Make Promises” are perfectly sculpted jewels, minimalist in their arrangements and details, every note essential. The songs from 2 are even more impressive. “You Upset the Grace of Living When You Lie,” “It’s Hard to Believe in Love for Long,” “Tribute to Hank Williams,” “Lady Came from Baltimore” are songs that pass as fleeting glimpses into a life sadly doomed. Haunting and sublime throughout.

1
2:24
 
2
2:16
 
3
1:55
 
4
4:34
 
5
2:14
 
6
2:34
 
7
1:57
 
8
2:12
 
9
2:16
 
10
3:34
 
11
1:57
 
12
2:01
 
13
2:41
 
14
2:34
 
15
1:54
 
16
1:52
 
17
1:54
 
18
1:46
 
19
3:16
 
20
1:13
 
21
2:17
 
22
3:11
 
23
2:35
 
24
2:08
 
1
2:21
 
2
5:40
 
3
2:05
 
4
2:46
 
5
3:39
 
6
2:53
 
7
2:28
 
8
5:20
 
9
2:38
 
10
2:26
 
11
3:01
 
12
4:05
 
13
5:04
 
14
4:03
 
15
3:14
 
16
2:17
 
17
2:10
 
18
3:45
 
19
2:32
 
20
2:41
 
21
4:04
 
22
2:01
 
23
3:55
 

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