10 Songs, 32 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ween’s 12 Golden Country Greats came out at the height of the so-called alt-country movement, consisting mostly of young bands applying vintage country-music accouterments to what were essentially roots-rock songs in the vein of Bruce Springsteen. Some regarded the movement as a subversion of the country genre, so in grand Ween fashion, 12 Golden Country Greats subverted the subversion. Reverential without being duplicative, Ween’s album isn't at all sarcastic. Dean and Gene Ween genuinely loved the '60s and '70s Nashville albums at which the alt-country bands rolled their eyes. That’s why Ween hired Nash-Vegas session vets like Charlie McCoy and Hargus “Pig” Robbins to play on the album. The effect isn't satirical—not completely, anyway. Thankfully, at a concise 10 songs (yes, the fudged number in the title is quintessential Ween comedy), the album doesn’t overplay its hand. Better still, the duo’s skewed sense of humor overlaps with country tradition just enough to put songs like “P*ss Up a Rope” and “Japanese Cowboy” within an authentic country tradition.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ween’s 12 Golden Country Greats came out at the height of the so-called alt-country movement, consisting mostly of young bands applying vintage country-music accouterments to what were essentially roots-rock songs in the vein of Bruce Springsteen. Some regarded the movement as a subversion of the country genre, so in grand Ween fashion, 12 Golden Country Greats subverted the subversion. Reverential without being duplicative, Ween’s album isn't at all sarcastic. Dean and Gene Ween genuinely loved the '60s and '70s Nashville albums at which the alt-country bands rolled their eyes. That’s why Ween hired Nash-Vegas session vets like Charlie McCoy and Hargus “Pig” Robbins to play on the album. The effect isn't satirical—not completely, anyway. Thankfully, at a concise 10 songs (yes, the fudged number in the title is quintessential Ween comedy), the album doesn’t overplay its hand. Better still, the duo’s skewed sense of humor overlaps with country tradition just enough to put songs like “P*ss Up a Rope” and “Japanese Cowboy” within an authentic country tradition.

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