16 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After the barrage of edgy protest tunes and face-melting acid rock played at jet-engine volumes, something had to provide a contrast during the late ‘60s . . . something like bubblegum pop. Enter The 1910 Fruitgum Company. With the band members’ Colgate smiles, coiffed hair, and a prefabricated sound, 1967’s “Simple Simon” was an instant smash hit, with a contagious melody and more backing-vocal bah-bah-bahs than a room full of Osmonds. But there’s more to The Best of The 1910 Fruitgum Co. than songs for small children. Although “May I Take a Giant Step (Into Your Heart)” plays on the kids’ game Mother May I, the lyrics inch toward playful boy-meets-girl flirtations that hit home with hormonal teenyboppers. The following “Please Me, Tease Me” did even more so. This compilation boasts a sonically magnifying remaster; you just won’t find a better-sounding, more thorough collection of The 1910 Fruitgum Company than this one.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After the barrage of edgy protest tunes and face-melting acid rock played at jet-engine volumes, something had to provide a contrast during the late ‘60s . . . something like bubblegum pop. Enter The 1910 Fruitgum Company. With the band members’ Colgate smiles, coiffed hair, and a prefabricated sound, 1967’s “Simple Simon” was an instant smash hit, with a contagious melody and more backing-vocal bah-bah-bahs than a room full of Osmonds. But there’s more to The Best of The 1910 Fruitgum Co. than songs for small children. Although “May I Take a Giant Step (Into Your Heart)” plays on the kids’ game Mother May I, the lyrics inch toward playful boy-meets-girl flirtations that hit home with hormonal teenyboppers. The following “Please Me, Tease Me” did even more so. This compilation boasts a sonically magnifying remaster; you just won’t find a better-sounding, more thorough collection of The 1910 Fruitgum Company than this one.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.1 out of 5
21 Ratings

21 Ratings

vrod5ive ,

A Little More Clearer...

During the late sixties, producers Jerry Kasenetz and Jeff Katz made recordings specifically for the subteen youth market. They called it "bubble gum" music. So began their venture with the 1910 Fruitgum Company. Their productions featured the lead voice of writer-producer Joey Levine, who was also the studio voice of The Ohio Express and the group Reunion, who had the hit tune "Life is a Rock (But The Radio Rolled Me). These groups, among others, were not actually working groups.The actual recordings were made by session musicians and vocalists. Touring groups were organized to make personal appearances after these records began selling in the millions.

Bubblegum Archivist ,

Misinformation and Corrections.

The lead singer of the band, for it's entire existence, was Mark Gutkowski. There has been some confusion about this, for some reason. Joey Levine was the lead singer of the Ohio Expres and never sang on their singles or album tracks. It is true that session musicians were employed at times in recordings, but certainly not on everything. They had some pretty great musicians in the lineup, actually. The greatest similarity between the bands in this era of Super K management has to do with the team of songwriters that Buddah records employed. This is beginning of what we term bubblegum music, as the name of the band implies. And it's not quite as innocent as people have made it out to be...listen a little closer to the lyrics and you will discover some very surprising messages in-between the lines. I mean, it was the 60s, right? The band, basically a group of 16-18 year old kids got pigeonholed quickly in a rough industry, which is a shame because their last album "The Train" is pretty incredible--and a far cry from their bubblegum roots. It's a tough record to find, but if you can find it at a record store, it's definitely worthwhile.

The band who is currently touring under the name 1910 Fruitgum Co. has 1 or 2 members from the original lineup, and Gutkowski doesn't sing for this re-incarnation of the band.

TheHud ,

Same producer as Ohio Express

Boy bands started a lot earlier than many people realize. This group was a creation of Buddah Records house producers Jerry Kasenetz and Jeff Katz, also the masterminds behind the Ohio Express and the Music Explosion This is why many people think they are the same or ripping each other off. In fact, the same people are behind them. They were mainly studio musicians hired to produce a certain pop sound. If you like fluffy pop, here you go.

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