11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

When Sachiko Kanenobu released Misora in 1972, there wasn’t much Western-style folk music being made in Japan period, let alone by women writing their own songs. Mixing the breezy, jazz- and country-inflected feel of Laurel Canyon (“Anata Kara Toku E,” “Toki Ni Makasete”) with the slightly more psychedelic sound of British artists like Donovan and Pentangle (“Kagero,” “Misora”), Misora established Kanenobu as a cult figure in ’70s folk—a reputation cemented in part by the fact that she didn’t release another solo album for nearly 20 years. Produced by the legendary Haruomi Hosono (then playing with Happy End; soon to form Yellow Magic Orchestra), the music still sounds remarkably fresh, an ancestral seed for contemporary admirers like Devendra Banhart and Steve Gunn, not to mention a fascinating example of how folk and psychedelia percolated internationally.

EDITORS’ NOTES

When Sachiko Kanenobu released Misora in 1972, there wasn’t much Western-style folk music being made in Japan period, let alone by women writing their own songs. Mixing the breezy, jazz- and country-inflected feel of Laurel Canyon (“Anata Kara Toku E,” “Toki Ni Makasete”) with the slightly more psychedelic sound of British artists like Donovan and Pentangle (“Kagero,” “Misora”), Misora established Kanenobu as a cult figure in ’70s folk—a reputation cemented in part by the fact that she didn’t release another solo album for nearly 20 years. Produced by the legendary Haruomi Hosono (then playing with Happy End; soon to form Yellow Magic Orchestra), the music still sounds remarkably fresh, an ancestral seed for contemporary admirers like Devendra Banhart and Steve Gunn, not to mention a fascinating example of how folk and psychedelia percolated internationally.

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