29 Songs, 1 Hour 15 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The 2003 breakthrough from garagey New York trio Yeah Yeah Yeahs was among a handful of albums—including The White Stripes’ Elephant and The Strokes’ Room on Fire—that signaled a creative renaissance in rock. Anchored by singer Karen O’s wounded wail on the time-stopping “Maps,” the music here—like the best of The White Stripes—manages to be both lean and anthemic, minimal and huge—from ballads like “Modern Romance” to the moody, disco-tinged “Y Control” and the noisy rockabilly of “Pin.” There's also a slew of rarities here, from practice recordings of “Date with the Night” to B-sides and unreleased tracks like the B-movie freak-out “Graveyard,” giving an intimate look at the making of a modern rock classic.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The 2003 breakthrough from garagey New York trio Yeah Yeah Yeahs was among a handful of albums—including The White Stripes’ Elephant and The Strokes’ Room on Fire—that signaled a creative renaissance in rock. Anchored by singer Karen O’s wounded wail on the time-stopping “Maps,” the music here—like the best of The White Stripes—manages to be both lean and anthemic, minimal and huge—from ballads like “Modern Romance” to the moody, disco-tinged “Y Control” and the noisy rockabilly of “Pin.” There's also a slew of rarities here, from practice recordings of “Date with the Night” to B-sides and unreleased tracks like the B-movie freak-out “Graveyard,” giving an intimate look at the making of a modern rock classic.

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