31 Songs, 2 Hours 12 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bob Marley’s 1976 album Rastaman Vibration marks the moment when the Jamaican singer transformed from an emerging reggae star into an international pop icon, creating a world-conquering sound out of the three elements he namechecks on the album’s second song: “Roots, Rock, Reggae”. Marley’s mastery is untouchable on keening, lovestruck ballads like “Cry to Me” and gritty, urban tales like “Johnny Was”; he even finds a way to incorporate a Haile Selassie speech into a slinking, intense riddim on “War”.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bob Marley’s 1976 album Rastaman Vibration marks the moment when the Jamaican singer transformed from an emerging reggae star into an international pop icon, creating a world-conquering sound out of the three elements he namechecks on the album’s second song: “Roots, Rock, Reggae”. Marley’s mastery is untouchable on keening, lovestruck ballads like “Cry to Me” and gritty, urban tales like “Johnny Was”; he even finds a way to incorporate a Haile Selassie speech into a slinking, intense riddim on “War”.

TITLE TIME

More By Bob Marley & The Wailers