11 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Guitarist Mick Box continues to soldier on with Uriah Heep, the hard- rock/heavy metal band considered to be one of the inspirations for This Is Spinal Tap. While the band was surely a pure ‘70s group prone to the excesses of the era, Uriah Heep have also been unjustly maligned for their adherence to powerful, heavy music. Forty years on, with drummer Russell Gilbrook, who replaced an ailing Lee Kerslake in 2007, and singer Bernie Shaw, the Heep continue their mission undaunted. “I Can See You” throws the classic Box guitars up against Phil Lanzon’s doom organ for a sound that’s been their trademark since Very ‘eavy…Very ‘umble. Their uncompromising nature means hardcore fans are always amply rewarded for keeping the faith. The rapid-fire charge of “Into the Wild,” the dark metal-funk of “Money Talk” and the majestic grandeur of the simply perfect “Southern Star” prove you can mock, you can tease, but a good band will always get the last laugh.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Guitarist Mick Box continues to soldier on with Uriah Heep, the hard- rock/heavy metal band considered to be one of the inspirations for This Is Spinal Tap. While the band was surely a pure ‘70s group prone to the excesses of the era, Uriah Heep have also been unjustly maligned for their adherence to powerful, heavy music. Forty years on, with drummer Russell Gilbrook, who replaced an ailing Lee Kerslake in 2007, and singer Bernie Shaw, the Heep continue their mission undaunted. “I Can See You” throws the classic Box guitars up against Phil Lanzon’s doom organ for a sound that’s been their trademark since Very ‘eavy…Very ‘umble. Their uncompromising nature means hardcore fans are always amply rewarded for keeping the faith. The rapid-fire charge of “Into the Wild,” the dark metal-funk of “Money Talk” and the majestic grandeur of the simply perfect “Southern Star” prove you can mock, you can tease, but a good band will always get the last laugh.

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