4 Songs, 1 Hour 15 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Returning to the ambient forms of groundbreaking albums like Music for Airports, Brian Eno stretches an airy, enveloping mood across four long, interrelated, eponymously titled variations on 2012’s LUX, an album with the easy drift of afternoon sunlight slipping across an empty room. Neil Catchpole’s strings provide resonant warmth and Leo Abrahams’ guitar synthesizer lends droplets of quicksilver tone, but Eno’s sounds mostly feel sourceless, with muted chimes and synths pinging like slow-motion wind chimes. LUX is as placid and meditative as ambient gets.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Returning to the ambient forms of groundbreaking albums like Music for Airports, Brian Eno stretches an airy, enveloping mood across four long, interrelated, eponymously titled variations on 2012’s LUX, an album with the easy drift of afternoon sunlight slipping across an empty room. Neil Catchpole’s strings provide resonant warmth and Leo Abrahams’ guitar synthesizer lends droplets of quicksilver tone, but Eno’s sounds mostly feel sourceless, with muted chimes and synths pinging like slow-motion wind chimes. LUX is as placid and meditative as ambient gets.

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