19 Songs, 1 Hour 14 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Moby has nimbly traversed musical genres throughout his career, gliding from punk singer to techno wizard to rock man and beyond. After 2008’s dance-floor friendly Last Night, he retreated to his home studio and surfaced with Wait for Me: a beautiful, moody, cinematic album more suited for headphone meditation than a dance marathon. The symphonic starter, “Division”, consists of orchestral strings that naturally roll into “Pale Horses”, a downtempo composition painted by a mournful female singer waxing tragically poetic. On the instrumental “Shot In the Back of the Head”, the orchestration is augmented by the sample of a lazy, backward guitar riff and the result is breathtaking. Ethereal “Walk With Me” finds Moby developing various melodies from a single chord, while raspy female vocals channel a vintage spiritual. Wait for Me is a cohesive collection that would be a natural fit for a noir film score – its downtempo compositions subtly evolve like light filtering through a window, casting shadows that leave emotive impressions, but no tangible trail.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Moby has nimbly traversed musical genres throughout his career, gliding from punk singer to techno wizard to rock man and beyond. After 2008’s dance-floor friendly Last Night, he retreated to his home studio and surfaced with Wait for Me: a beautiful, moody, cinematic album more suited for headphone meditation than a dance marathon. The symphonic starter, “Division”, consists of orchestral strings that naturally roll into “Pale Horses”, a downtempo composition painted by a mournful female singer waxing tragically poetic. On the instrumental “Shot In the Back of the Head”, the orchestration is augmented by the sample of a lazy, backward guitar riff and the result is breathtaking. Ethereal “Walk With Me” finds Moby developing various melodies from a single chord, while raspy female vocals channel a vintage spiritual. Wait for Me is a cohesive collection that would be a natural fit for a noir film score – its downtempo compositions subtly evolve like light filtering through a window, casting shadows that leave emotive impressions, but no tangible trail.

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