18 Songs, 1 Hour 11 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Re-issued and expanded for its 15th anniversary, Max Richter’s The Blue Notebooks, a heartfelt protest against political, social and personal brutality, remains ahead of its time. The album’s original mix of electronica, classical elements and sensuous, textured sounds was a huge influence on a new age of composers, and is now supplemented with new arrangements, remixes and the previously unreleased track “A Catalogue of Afternoons”. “On the Nature of Daylight”—presented here in full-orchestral splendour and with a version that includes the haunting voice of Dinah Washington—has become a go-to piece for TV and cinema soundtracks, while “‘Iconography”, with its cascades of organ, almost single-handedly spawned a new dawn for film music.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Re-issued and expanded for its 15th anniversary, Max Richter’s The Blue Notebooks, a heartfelt protest against political, social and personal brutality, remains ahead of its time. The album’s original mix of electronica, classical elements and sensuous, textured sounds was a huge influence on a new age of composers, and is now supplemented with new arrangements, remixes and the previously unreleased track “A Catalogue of Afternoons”. “On the Nature of Daylight”—presented here in full-orchestral splendour and with a version that includes the haunting voice of Dinah Washington—has become a go-to piece for TV and cinema soundtracks, while “‘Iconography”, with its cascades of organ, almost single-handedly spawned a new dawn for film music.

TITLE TIME

More By Max Richter