10 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

“Lions in Cages” opens Wolf Gang’s debut album with a soaring optimism similar to recordings by MGMT and The Flaming Lips. Frontman Max McElligott has carefully crafted some next-level indie pop, but credit also goes to producer extraordinaire Dave Fridmann, who's worked with the aforementioned bands. It’s easy to draw comparisons between Londoner McElligott and early Elvis Costello after hearing the pop gem “Something Unusual,” where pub-rock subtleties pepper the vocal melody under shimmering, synthesizer-based instrumentation and near-danceable grooves. With its captivating balance of restrained grip and erupting glamour, “Stay and Defend” bobs and weaves on a strain of “David DNA” that’s equal parts Byrne and Bowie. The orchestral approach to the title track's moody melody may garner comparisons to Lana Del Rey’s “Video Games,” but McElligott follows this with a diametric dose of disco-glam that’s nearly impossible to hear without moving your feet. “Planets” is a triumphant ballad, serving as a reminder that a good album should close epically.

EDITORS’ NOTES

“Lions in Cages” opens Wolf Gang’s debut album with a soaring optimism similar to recordings by MGMT and The Flaming Lips. Frontman Max McElligott has carefully crafted some next-level indie pop, but credit also goes to producer extraordinaire Dave Fridmann, who's worked with the aforementioned bands. It’s easy to draw comparisons between Londoner McElligott and early Elvis Costello after hearing the pop gem “Something Unusual,” where pub-rock subtleties pepper the vocal melody under shimmering, synthesizer-based instrumentation and near-danceable grooves. With its captivating balance of restrained grip and erupting glamour, “Stay and Defend” bobs and weaves on a strain of “David DNA” that’s equal parts Byrne and Bowie. The orchestral approach to the title track's moody melody may garner comparisons to Lana Del Rey’s “Video Games,” but McElligott follows this with a diametric dose of disco-glam that’s nearly impossible to hear without moving your feet. “Planets” is a triumphant ballad, serving as a reminder that a good album should close epically.

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