21 Songs, 1 Hour 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With the false start that opens Jamiroquai’s seventh studio album, you can actually hear Jay Kay and company trying to kick over that dusty old groove engine. After all, it was five years between 2005’s Dynamite and 2010’s Rock Dust Light Star. And then it took another two years for the album to come out in the United States. The title track opens with rootsy rocking guitars, a slow-grooving rhythm section, and a melody that eases listeners into the funk, like a slow slip into the Jacuzzi. Once inside, the drums hit a little harder and the voices of female backing soul singers flesh out the tune into a party. By the second song, “White Knuckle Ride”, everything is back in full swing with a pulsing disco beat, neon synthesizers, and a buttery bass. Kay pulls some booty out of the mix for “Blue Skies”, a detour ballad with heavenly backing singers and Studio 54–era strings; it's Jamiroquai’s best post-party lullaby yet.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With the false start that opens Jamiroquai’s seventh studio album, you can actually hear Jay Kay and company trying to kick over that dusty old groove engine. After all, it was five years between 2005’s Dynamite and 2010’s Rock Dust Light Star. And then it took another two years for the album to come out in the United States. The title track opens with rootsy rocking guitars, a slow-grooving rhythm section, and a melody that eases listeners into the funk, like a slow slip into the Jacuzzi. Once inside, the drums hit a little harder and the voices of female backing soul singers flesh out the tune into a party. By the second song, “White Knuckle Ride”, everything is back in full swing with a pulsing disco beat, neon synthesizers, and a buttery bass. Kay pulls some booty out of the mix for “Blue Skies”, a detour ballad with heavenly backing singers and Studio 54–era strings; it's Jamiroquai’s best post-party lullaby yet.

TITLE TIME
20
21

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