12 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

M.I.A.’s debut Arular, with its roaring electro and outspoken calls to third world unity, stood out as one of the most critically polarizing and creatively bracing releases of 2005. For her followup M.I.A. has largely adhered to the chaotic template that originally brought her fame. Standout track “Paper Planes” comes off like a ragga-tinged schoolyard chant perforated by gunfire, while the frenetic stomp of lead single “Boyz” would sound right at home next to any Timbaland helmed club anthem. Indeed Timbaland’s world-spanning sonic aesthetic is clearly a touchstone for M.I.A., yet her beats are touched with an air of pseudo-militant righteousness and barely restrained dissonance sure to appeal to fanciers of the pop avant-garde. Kala, stands out as an album full of a sense of undeniable energy.

EDITORS’ NOTES

M.I.A.’s debut Arular, with its roaring electro and outspoken calls to third world unity, stood out as one of the most critically polarizing and creatively bracing releases of 2005. For her followup M.I.A. has largely adhered to the chaotic template that originally brought her fame. Standout track “Paper Planes” comes off like a ragga-tinged schoolyard chant perforated by gunfire, while the frenetic stomp of lead single “Boyz” would sound right at home next to any Timbaland helmed club anthem. Indeed Timbaland’s world-spanning sonic aesthetic is clearly a touchstone for M.I.A., yet her beats are touched with an air of pseudo-militant righteousness and barely restrained dissonance sure to appeal to fanciers of the pop avant-garde. Kala, stands out as an album full of a sense of undeniable energy.

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