13 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Band of Horses have come a long way since their humble mid-2000s beginnings. Now, on a major label, fleshed out into a firm five-piece, and opening for Pearl Jam, Band of Horses are being groomed for the musical stars for which they always had the potential. This isn’t to say that their third album, 2010’s Infinite Arms, is some kind of larger than life arena-rock release. All the beautiful atmospherics of their earlier work is still retained in the vocals of Ben Bridwell. There’s a country-rock undertow to some of the rhythms, but the sweet Americana harmonies of “Factory” are beyond any definite genre. “Compliments” follows with an extra-terrestrial keyboard that sways the band towards New Wave. The grinding guitars of “Laredo” and the angelic vocal ensembles of “Blue Beard” lead to that solitary spacewalk Bridwell pulls off so convincingly. The brisk pop of “Dilly” proves the band hardly loiters in the existential murk of their many sadcore compatriots, while “Evening Kitchen” harmonizes with the somber cadence that accompanies the closing of long summer nights.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Band of Horses have come a long way since their humble mid-2000s beginnings. Now, on a major label, fleshed out into a firm five-piece, and opening for Pearl Jam, Band of Horses are being groomed for the musical stars for which they always had the potential. This isn’t to say that their third album, 2010’s Infinite Arms, is some kind of larger than life arena-rock release. All the beautiful atmospherics of their earlier work is still retained in the vocals of Ben Bridwell. There’s a country-rock undertow to some of the rhythms, but the sweet Americana harmonies of “Factory” are beyond any definite genre. “Compliments” follows with an extra-terrestrial keyboard that sways the band towards New Wave. The grinding guitars of “Laredo” and the angelic vocal ensembles of “Blue Beard” lead to that solitary spacewalk Bridwell pulls off so convincingly. The brisk pop of “Dilly” proves the band hardly loiters in the existential murk of their many sadcore compatriots, while “Evening Kitchen” harmonizes with the somber cadence that accompanies the closing of long summer nights.

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