Editors' Notes For her third album, Emily Jane White opts for a slightly more acoustic tone than she had on 2010's gorgeous, dark Victorian America, although swooping cellos and winsome violin still partner with pianos and electric guitars. Rather than veering into baroque, orchestrated folk territory (excepting the quite wonderful “Requiem Waltz”), the acoustic guitars, pedal steel, and White’s dusky voice all feel a shade lighter and earthier this time around. The set is mostly focused on singer/songwriter and folk textures, with acoustic fingerpicking sparkling throughout. Yet with White's lyrical poetry no less pained—“I’m damaged raw/can’t you see”? she begs on “The Law”—melancholy is still her middle name. (Emily Melancholy Jane White: is that too much?) From the sorrow-drenched ballad “The Black Oak” to the barroom slow-dance of “The Cliff” and the haunting, gossamer folk of “Black Silk”, this extraordinary artist and her steadfast partners (musicians and studio captains all) have created another starkly beautiful album that's simply enchanting.

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