11 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The seeds of the Dead Weather were first sprinkled during the Kills' opening slot for the Raconteurs. Jack White was given doctor's orders to take it easy on the vocals, then inviting Alison Mosshart to help out. All went so well, they took things into the studio along with Raconteurs' Jack Lawrence and Queens of the Stone Age's Dean Fertita. The result? Horehound — a deep and dark sojourn into electrified rock with stuttering funk backbeats (courtesy of Mr. White who anchors the group as drummer, but pops up with the occasional line and vocal tic all throughout). Electric organ and fuzz-ed up bass ride up alongside Mossheart's grimy, rock-addled vocals on "Treat Me Like Your Mother" and "Hand You Up From the Heavens" while other tracks show a sense of experimentation akin to the rhythm-based freakouts of early Jamaican dub. Easily the most forward-thinking project that Mr. Jack White has been involved in and undoubtedly a triumph. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

The seeds of the Dead Weather were first sprinkled during the Kills' opening slot for the Raconteurs. Jack White was given doctor's orders to take it easy on the vocals, then inviting Alison Mosshart to help out. All went so well, they took things into the studio along with Raconteurs' Jack Lawrence and Queens of the Stone Age's Dean Fertita. The result? Horehound — a deep and dark sojourn into electrified rock with stuttering funk backbeats (courtesy of Mr. White who anchors the group as drummer, but pops up with the occasional line and vocal tic all throughout). Electric organ and fuzz-ed up bass ride up alongside Mossheart's grimy, rock-addled vocals on "Treat Me Like Your Mother" and "Hand You Up From the Heavens" while other tracks show a sense of experimentation akin to the rhythm-based freakouts of early Jamaican dub. Easily the most forward-thinking project that Mr. Jack White has been involved in and undoubtedly a triumph. 

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