15 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With Brian Eno again in the producer’s seat and their rhythm section sharper than ever, Talking Heads bring searing hooks and savage wit to 1979’s Fear of Music, a Cold War dance party par excellence. “Life During Wartime” is apocalyptic and irresistible; the dubby, slow-motion “Drugs” is a psychedelic trip viewed from David Byrne’s keen-eyed remove. Their funk is fiercest on the opening “I Zimbra,” with stop-start riffs and rolling Afro-Latin percussion framing a gospel-flavored chorus; the second half’s guitars sound like they’re from another planet.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With Brian Eno again in the producer’s seat and their rhythm section sharper than ever, Talking Heads bring searing hooks and savage wit to 1979’s Fear of Music, a Cold War dance party par excellence. “Life During Wartime” is apocalyptic and irresistible; the dubby, slow-motion “Drugs” is a psychedelic trip viewed from David Byrne’s keen-eyed remove. Their funk is fiercest on the opening “I Zimbra,” with stop-start riffs and rolling Afro-Latin percussion framing a gospel-flavored chorus; the second half’s guitars sound like they’re from another planet.

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