17 Songs, 1 Hour 18 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Schumann knew his way around the cello almost as intimately as he did the piano. That said, it’s a mystery why he wrote so little for it, especially as the cello is often compared to the human voice, for which the composer wrote more than 400 songs. Still, what he left behind is wonderful, from the tempestuous Cello Concerto to the joyful Adagio and Allegro and thrilling, deeply felt Phantasiestücke, inspired by Mendelssohn. Performing them is a crack team: cellist Gautier Capuçon, pianist Martha Argerich and the Chamber Orchestra of Europe, inspirational under Bernard Haitink, their playing full of élan and a profound passion for this incredible music.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Schumann knew his way around the cello almost as intimately as he did the piano. That said, it’s a mystery why he wrote so little for it, especially as the cello is often compared to the human voice, for which the composer wrote more than 400 songs. Still, what he left behind is wonderful, from the tempestuous Cello Concerto to the joyful Adagio and Allegro and thrilling, deeply felt Phantasiestücke, inspired by Mendelssohn. Performing them is a crack team: cellist Gautier Capuçon, pianist Martha Argerich and the Chamber Orchestra of Europe, inspirational under Bernard Haitink, their playing full of élan and a profound passion for this incredible music.

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