9 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Carl Philipp Emanuel’s cello concertos are packed with drama, melodic brilliance and boundless invention. The scoring for orchestra is as thrilling as it is for the soloist. Marvel at the final movement of the A minor Concerto and its fidgety solo/orchestra dialogues, each constantly competing for attention, cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras displaying breathtaking agility. The A major Concerto’s pining, slow movement suggests Mozart’s greatest slow movements even though it was written before he was born. The G-major Symphony, which separates the two concertos, fizzes with spirit and daring. It’s difficult to imagine all three works here played with greater passion and excitement.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Carl Philipp Emanuel’s cello concertos are packed with drama, melodic brilliance and boundless invention. The scoring for orchestra is as thrilling as it is for the soloist. Marvel at the final movement of the A minor Concerto and its fidgety solo/orchestra dialogues, each constantly competing for attention, cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras displaying breathtaking agility. The A major Concerto’s pining, slow movement suggests Mozart’s greatest slow movements even though it was written before he was born. The G-major Symphony, which separates the two concertos, fizzes with spirit and daring. It’s difficult to imagine all three works here played with greater passion and excitement.

TITLE TIME

More By Jean-Guihen Queyras