12 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A powerful contemporary roots artist with a finely tuned ear for vintage reggae rhythms, Richie Spice has created a powerful body of work that harks back to the golden age of roots music while simultaneously demanding the attention of contemporary listeners. In more recent years, Spice has even gained a considerable following amongst fans of dubstep, who've been attracted to his work by high-profile remixes of his songs “Marijuana” and “Earth a Run Red” by the U.K.-based production team Digital Mystikz. Spice’s fifth album, The Book of Job, is a characteristically strong effort filled with rough-hewn productions and righteous sentiments informed by Spice’s Rastafarian faith. Many of the tracks here recall the smoldering intensity of Spice’s 2006 hit “Youths Dem Cold”, a stirring protest tune that decried Jamaica’s rampant economic inequalities while documenting the perilous day-to-day existence of Kingston youth. On “Serious Woman”, Spice delivers a stirring lovers-rock ode over the Nylon rhythm; it features an insistent, organ-drenched arrangement that nearly attains the heady heights of “Youth Dem Cold”.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A powerful contemporary roots artist with a finely tuned ear for vintage reggae rhythms, Richie Spice has created a powerful body of work that harks back to the golden age of roots music while simultaneously demanding the attention of contemporary listeners. In more recent years, Spice has even gained a considerable following amongst fans of dubstep, who've been attracted to his work by high-profile remixes of his songs “Marijuana” and “Earth a Run Red” by the U.K.-based production team Digital Mystikz. Spice’s fifth album, The Book of Job, is a characteristically strong effort filled with rough-hewn productions and righteous sentiments informed by Spice’s Rastafarian faith. Many of the tracks here recall the smoldering intensity of Spice’s 2006 hit “Youths Dem Cold”, a stirring protest tune that decried Jamaica’s rampant economic inequalities while documenting the perilous day-to-day existence of Kingston youth. On “Serious Woman”, Spice delivers a stirring lovers-rock ode over the Nylon rhythm; it features an insistent, organ-drenched arrangement that nearly attains the heady heights of “Youth Dem Cold”.

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