12 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

“Life is hard, and so am I.” With these words, Mark “E” Everett instantly thrust into Eels’ musically surreal, lyrically blunt universe, offering us “Novocaine for the Soul” with a calming concoction of slack-rap beats and otherworldly orchestration. Even at this early career stage, Everett had already mastered the art of handling heavy subjects with a light touch: “Susan’s House” sets gritty scenes of homeless women and crack-dealing teens atop shuffling grooves and soft-rock piano; “Flower” is a folk-hop woe-is-me lament leavened by churchly harmonies.

EDITORS’ NOTES

“Life is hard, and so am I.” With these words, Mark “E” Everett instantly thrust into Eels’ musically surreal, lyrically blunt universe, offering us “Novocaine for the Soul” with a calming concoction of slack-rap beats and otherworldly orchestration. Even at this early career stage, Everett had already mastered the art of handling heavy subjects with a light touch: “Susan’s House” sets gritty scenes of homeless women and crack-dealing teens atop shuffling grooves and soft-rock piano; “Flower” is a folk-hop woe-is-me lament leavened by churchly harmonies.

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