15 Songs, 58 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

“I’m making pop records,” The 1975 frontman Matty Healy told Beats 1 host Matt Wilkinson. “When I say we’re a pop band, what I’m really saying is we’re not a rock band. Please stop calling us a rock band—’cause I think that’s the only music we don’t make.”

It’s a fair comment: Thanks to their eclecticism and adventure, attempting to label The 1975 has been as easy as serving tea in a sieve. On their third album, the Cheshire four-piece are, once again, many things, including jazz crooners, 2-step experimentalists and yearning balladeers. What’s most impressive is their ability to wrangle all these ideas into coherent music—their outsize ambition never makes the songs feel cluttered. “I hate prog, I hate double albums, I hate indulgence,” said Healy. “I hate it when the world goes, ‘Hey, you’ve got our attention!’ and someone goes, ‘Right, well, if I’ve got your attention, how many guitar solos…’”

Crucially, Healy’s lyrics add extra substance to—and bind together—the kaleidoscope of styles. On the neo-jazz of “Sincerity Is Scary”, he rails against a modern aversion to emotional expression. Broadly an album about love in the digital age, A Brief Inquiry… offers compelling insights into Healy’s own life. “It’s Not Living (If It’s Not With You)” provides an unvarnished account of his heroin addiction, while “Surrounded By Heads and Bodies” draws on his experiences in rehab and “Be My Mistake” examines guilt and compulsion. “Honestly, you can look at your work and be like, ‘What did I do there that someone likes?’” he said. “Me, when I’m, like, really personal or really inward, really honest, that’s when I get the best reaction.”

Introspection needn’t breed a sombre mood though. From the tropical pop of “Tootimetootimetootime” to the spry electro-indie of “Give Yourself a Try”, this is an album full of uplifting, melodic rushes. “My favourite records are about life,” said Healy. “It may be a bit of a big thing to say, but I like the all-encompassing aspect of life: You can have these bits, the sad bits, but don’t leave the dancing out, you know what I mean?”

Parental Advisory Explicit Content Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

“I’m making pop records,” The 1975 frontman Matty Healy told Beats 1 host Matt Wilkinson. “When I say we’re a pop band, what I’m really saying is we’re not a rock band. Please stop calling us a rock band—’cause I think that’s the only music we don’t make.”

It’s a fair comment: Thanks to their eclecticism and adventure, attempting to label The 1975 has been as easy as serving tea in a sieve. On their third album, the Cheshire four-piece are, once again, many things, including jazz crooners, 2-step experimentalists and yearning balladeers. What’s most impressive is their ability to wrangle all these ideas into coherent music—their outsize ambition never makes the songs feel cluttered. “I hate prog, I hate double albums, I hate indulgence,” said Healy. “I hate it when the world goes, ‘Hey, you’ve got our attention!’ and someone goes, ‘Right, well, if I’ve got your attention, how many guitar solos…’”

Crucially, Healy’s lyrics add extra substance to—and bind together—the kaleidoscope of styles. On the neo-jazz of “Sincerity Is Scary”, he rails against a modern aversion to emotional expression. Broadly an album about love in the digital age, A Brief Inquiry… offers compelling insights into Healy’s own life. “It’s Not Living (If It’s Not With You)” provides an unvarnished account of his heroin addiction, while “Surrounded By Heads and Bodies” draws on his experiences in rehab and “Be My Mistake” examines guilt and compulsion. “Honestly, you can look at your work and be like, ‘What did I do there that someone likes?’” he said. “Me, when I’m, like, really personal or really inward, really honest, that’s when I get the best reaction.”

Introspection needn’t breed a sombre mood though. From the tropical pop of “Tootimetootimetootime” to the spry electro-indie of “Give Yourself a Try”, this is an album full of uplifting, melodic rushes. “My favourite records are about life,” said Healy. “It may be a bit of a big thing to say, but I like the all-encompassing aspect of life: You can have these bits, the sad bits, but don’t leave the dancing out, you know what I mean?”

Parental Advisory Explicit Content Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
165 Ratings

165 Ratings

whereisindy ,

Bravada.

The quartets’ 3rd and high anticipated album branches into deep jazz and ultra pop. Infused with their minor collaboration with No Rome of the Philippines Matty Healy has taken what he feels necessary to provide the foundation sound to his more serious and more relevant social commentary on love, relationships, technology, venerability and strength - all extrapolated from current global and personal crises.

The production is again faultless, with George Daniel now have worked on their bands 3rd album and fast adding himself among a serious contender for producer in his spare time, blending in the seamless production and ease of the sound on the ears all the while aptly interpreting the bands next sound and vision. The opening titular track which has been on all previous albums is a window into the bands currently meandering sound, if of course you have been brave enough to sequester yourself into not listening to anything recently released, well done, there is plenty to gorge on. “How to Draw/Petrichor” is a stunning rework of the band’ previous album track, while the catchy ultra-bravado “TOOTIMETOOTIMETOOTIME” is still a song that will linger as much as the band’ classic songs like “Anti-christ’”, “Me’, and “Robbers.” The difference to the 5 singles released prior boasts less pop and more nuance. Here Matty goes more to the softer side, using Radiohead’ 'OK Computer' as a template for the main ballast while effortlessly mixing in that niche 1975 lyrical style and passion. There’s far more piano, more bass elements, rough techno, well-balanced autotuned vocals and twisting of conventional sounds. There’s nothing to hide on this album as Matty goes on a full disclosure, honouring his past with cautionary messages.

That being said, the newest material is a little harder to get into on a first listens and for all appearances could alienate some fans. But like most works it deserves to be re-listened to in order to get the full gravitas. With this first half of the ‘Music for Cars’ era now released and into the world, a tour on the way to fill in the time between the next confirmed 4th album release ‘Notes on a Conditional Form’ we have a lot to digest and a lot to look forward to with a renewed sense of optimism mired in harsh reality.

stessex ,

Awful

Experimental crap.

Dixon999 ,

why is this considered alternative

Alternative to what? I hear pop music, this isn’t the kind of music i’d expect to see in an “alternative chart” It took 2 seconds to realise this wasn’t for me and certainly not alternative.

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