32 Songs, 1 Hour 17 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jaroussky’s sweet, flexible countertenor makes a perfect foil for the Euridice of Amanda Forsythe, whose light soprano might have been made for music of this period. Their voices complement each other beautifully and they convey the passion of this powerful, human, yet very immediate opera with real sensitivity. As Amore, Hungarian soprano Emőke Baráth is the thrid part of an impressive trio, while Diego Fasolis and I Barocchisti bring their customary style and dramatic insight to a work that is presented for the first time in a version made in 1774 for Naples.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jaroussky’s sweet, flexible countertenor makes a perfect foil for the Euridice of Amanda Forsythe, whose light soprano might have been made for music of this period. Their voices complement each other beautifully and they convey the passion of this powerful, human, yet very immediate opera with real sensitivity. As Amore, Hungarian soprano Emőke Baráth is the thrid part of an impressive trio, while Diego Fasolis and I Barocchisti bring their customary style and dramatic insight to a work that is presented for the first time in a version made in 1774 for Naples.

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