23 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Seven years after Jim Morrison’s passing, the surviving members of The Doors carried out their frontman’s wish of releasing a poetry album, adding complex, if brief, accompaniments to his imagistic verses. The band’s storied catalog echoes throughout; “Newborn Awakening” frames Morrison’s funereal stanzas with the jammy “Peace Frog,” while “Roadhouse Blues” appears in live form. But the real attraction is Morrison’s commanding voice: Its messianic quality heightens the surrealism of his work and solidifies his status as one of rock’s enduring poets.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Seven years after Jim Morrison’s passing, the surviving members of The Doors carried out their frontman’s wish of releasing a poetry album, adding complex, if brief, accompaniments to his imagistic verses. The band’s storied catalog echoes throughout; “Newborn Awakening” frames Morrison’s funereal stanzas with the jammy “Peace Frog,” while “Roadhouse Blues” appears in live form. But the real attraction is Morrison’s commanding voice: Its messianic quality heightens the surrealism of his work and solidifies his status as one of rock’s enduring poets.

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