Editors' Notes The worlds of indie and dance music had been flirting with one another since the ‘80s, when acts like the Pet Shop Boys fused the attitude of the former and the euphoria of the latter into smart, sardonic synth-pop. Electro-curious ‘90s Britpop groups like Blur would inherit that sensibility, but the subsequent rise of big-beat electronica—and its punkier evil sibling, electroclash—inspired a full-blown indie/dance consummation in the 2000s. The courtship worked both ways: On the one side, bands like The Rapture emboldened aloof hipsters to break their crossed-arm stance and loosen up with gritty disco-punk grooves; on the other, electronic acts like Justice jacked up their beats with rock muscle. Before long, alt-rock artists like Phoenix had retooled their aesthetic for the EDM era, while pop divas (Robyn) and left-field auteurs (M83) alike tuned into the same blissful frequency.

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